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One-Hour Workout: Triple Threat Brick

If you currently have limited or zero pool access, fear not—this bike-run brick workout will give you the multisport action you've been craving.

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If, like many triathletes during the COVID-19 pandemic, you’ve had limited or even zero access to your local pool, then it’s a great time to focus on other areas such as bike-run bricks and, of course—transitions. This workout, from coach Tristen Rogers of the HAT Altitude Team, is a fun way to practice your bike-to-run transitions as well as get accustomed to the physiological sensations associated with switching from bike to run—and back again.

You’ll begin with a 15-minute bike (10 minutes steady in Zone 2 followed by four minutes in Zone 4, then one minute Zone 1) before transitioning to a one-mile run at 80% effort (think of this as slightly faster than half marathon pace). After that, it’s back to the bike for two rounds of four minutes in Zone 4, followed by one minute in Zone 1. Aim to keep your transitions under one minute as you then head into another one-mile run, this time at 90% effort (or 10K race pace). The third and final part of the workout involves another two rounds on the bike of four minutes in Zone 4, followed by one minute in Zone 1. Transition to your final one-mile run effort which this time is at 5K pace/intensity. Wrap it all up with a five-minute walk to allow your heart rate to come back down.

Rogers said: “The overall key to executing this workout well is to continually increase your speed on each running segment of the workout, starting with a tempo pace and ending with an effort close to your current 5k pace. The focus of the workout is on quickly moving from bike-to-run and trying to make it more efficient with each round. If you are doing this workout indoors, this can be as easy as hopping off the trainer, changing shoes, and jumping on the treadmill. If you are outside, this means using a space where you can quickly secure your bike before taking off to run (think of it like racking your bike in T2).”

Rogers said her athletes often comment on how the increasing efforts in this workout make it challenging and also simulate the way you feel on race day, trying to move as efficiently but yet as quickly as possible in transition.

“This workout helps to increase their confidence, ready to nail it on race day!” she added.

One-Hour Workout: Triple Threat Brick

BRICK #1:

Bike:  10 min. building into a steady Zone 2 effort, then 4 min. in Zone 4 (85%-90%), 1 min. in Zone 1 (60%) riding with high cadence to flush your legs

(Transition: try to keep it to 30 sec.)

Run: 1 mile at 80% effort (slightly faster than half marathon pace)

(Transition back to the bike, 1-2 min. ideally)

BRICK #2:

Bike: Repeat twice: 4 min. in Zone 4 (85-90%), 1 min. in Zone 1

(Transition: try to keep it to 30 sec.)

Run: 1 mile at 90% effort (10K pace)

(Transition back to the bike, 1-2 min. ideally)

BRICK #3:

Bike: Repeat twice: 4 min. in Zone 4 (85-90%), 1 min. in Zone 1

(Transition: try to keep it to 30 sec.)

Run: 1 mile FAST at 5K pace

Cool-down:

5 min. of brisk to slow walking, to allow heart rate to come down

Tristen Rogers is a USAT Level 2 Coach, Head Coach of the HAT Altitude Team, and owner of HAT House Endurance Camps