Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

Training

Don’t Text and Train!

Talking or texting on a cell phone while you exercise will lower your workout intensity and alter your balance.

For access to all of our training, gear, and race coverage, plus exclusive training plans, FinisherPix photos, event discounts, and GPS apps, sign up for Outside+.

Talking or texting on a cell phone while you exercise will lower your workout intensity and alter your balance. That’s the latest info from researchers at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania who’ve released two studies looking into the effects of texting, listening to music and talking on exercise. In their latest study, published in December, the researchers examined 45 college students’ cell phone use during postural stability tests. They found texting can impact stability by 45 percent when compared to no cell phone use, possibly predisposing texters to falls and injuries during workouts; talking while exercising reduces stability by 19 percent. Listening to music on a cell phone, however, shouldn’t mess up your balance—but it can make you work out harder, increasing the intensity of both speed and heart rate during exercise. That’s what the team found during a 2015 study in which subjects talked, texted and listened to music on their cell phones during a 30-minute treadmill run. They also found that texting and talking reduced the intensity of the workout. Lesson learned? During your next treadmill run, set your phone to airplane mode and crank the tunes.