One hour workouts

One-Hour Workout: Cadence Brick Builders

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Even the best laid plans can fall to the wayside during the unpredictability of race day. Sometimes the weather is hotter than you’ve trained in, sometimes just the excitement of the race can cause you to go too fast, too early and suffer later on the bike.

Regardless of how race day actually plays out, this workout will prepare your running legs to get into a rhythm no matter what the swim and bike throws at them. This week’s workout is all about maintaining proper running form and cadence, even after a fatiguing bike leg.

This workout is best done on a trainer set up at a local track or similar running circuit. The idea is to get off the bike quickly—set up your T2 just like you would for race day—and quickly fall into your running race pace. If you don’t have a trainer, a moderate hill that takes no less than six minutes to climb at a solid pace will work as well. Park your car at the top, and toss it inside during your makeshift T2.

Shift into an increasingly harder gear on each interval to ensure that effort increases and cadence decreases. Particularly at the end of the workout, be sure that you’re still pedaling in circles—pushing down, pulling up—even when the cadences get very low. Try to check in with your running cadence as well to ensure that it’s consistent throughout, and not getting lower. Change into an easy gear during the rest to spin legs out while recovering.

This is a tough mid- to late-season workout, but done once every other week, it’ll prepare your body for almost anything race day can throw at it.

Warm-up
8 min easy spin on trainer
4 min of (30 sec right leg only/30 sec left leg only to cement good pedaling form)
3 min east both legs

Main Set
5 min at 6/10 effort, 80 rpm on bike, quick transition
3 min at race pace/cadence on run; 2 min EZ spin at 90+ rpm on bike
5 min at 7/10 effort, 70 rpm on bike, quick transition
3 min at race pace/cadence on run; 2 min EZ spin at 90+ rpm on bike
5 min at 8/10 effort, 60 rpm on bike, quick transition
3 min at race pace/cadence on run; 2 min EZ spin at 90+ rpm on bike
5 min at 9/10 effort, <60 rpm on bike, quick transition
3 min at race pace/cadence on run

Cool-down
5 min EZ spin at 90+ rpm on bike

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One-Hour Workout: “Onesies” Run Speedwork

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This week’s workout comes from Tanya Deeks, the owner and head coach of Ontario, Canada-based Unleash The Beast Multisport and can be done on the track but is a great option for tackling spadework on the roads. Deeks is a NCCP triathlon, cycling, nordic ski and swim coach—as well as a certified personal trainer. She has competed in seven Ironman events and over a dozen half-Ironmans. In 2015 Deeks was fourth in her age group at ITU Cross Triathlon World Championships.

“This is a great workout for shaking things up and getting your body into gear for longer and more intense speed workouts,” Deeks says. “It’s also a great workout to teach your body and mind that you can recover while running.

“The ‘fast’ minute should be run at a pace that is tough but can be maintained for the whole interval, knowing you still have to run easy at the end. The focus during the easy minute should be on technique and deep breathing to aid in recovery. Beginners should start a bit conservatively and build the pace throughout the minute. Start by doing two rounds of the main set, building to six rounds over three to four weeks.”

Warm-up
10-minute easy run with drills

Main Set
4 x 6 minutes as:
(1 minute fast (8/10, Z4)
1 minute easy
1 minute fast
1 minute easy
1 minute fast
1 minute easy)

2 minutes easy jog/powerwalk

Cool-down
10-minute easy run

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One-Hour Workout: Early-Season Run Speed

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s run speed workout comes from Tom Manzi, a USAT Level II coach with Joe Friel’s Training Bible Coaching company since 1997. Manzi, who splits his time between southern Arizona and the Jersey Shore, uses this workout with his many of his athletes, who range from newbies to elites.

Early-Season Run Speed Workout:

Warmup
20 mins easy, build pace every 5 mins
Include some 20 to 30 sec pickups, increase to max effort in the final 5 mins.

Main set
1 min hard, 1 min easy. Repeat 10 times.
Ensure the hard is sustained max effort, the easy should be jog/walk.

Cool-down
10–15 mins easy

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: The Mountain Goat

One-Hour Workout: The Mountain Goat

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s run workout comes from Dan Graovac, a USAT Level I coach and the owner of Boston-based GForce Multisport.

“It’s not all that complicated, but it’s a good hill workout that’s really some speedwork in disguise,” Graovac says.

RUN: The Mountain Goat
Find a good, long hill and have some fun.

Warmup
Dynamic stretches (Try these!)
10 mins easy running on flat ground

Repeat the following three times:
30 secs up, easy jog back down
1 min up, easy jog back down
2 mins up, easy jog back down
3 mins up, easy jog back down

Cooldown
10 min easy recovery

RELATED: Making The Most Of One Hour

Ride Out The Storm: A One-Hour Indoor Cycling Workout

Our thoughts are with everyone in the Northeastern United States battling the effects of Hurricane Sandy. Because several endurance enthusiasts are stuck indoors and many gyms are closed, we thought we’d bring back an indoor cycling workout to help you ride out the storm. This indoor trainer workout comes from the Book “One-Hour Workouts: 50 Swim, Bike, and Run Workouts for Busy Athletes.”

This is an idea I got from Ironman legend Dave Scott when I was a pro, and it helped make my winter indoor cycling much more tolerable. I’m very reluctant to train indoors, which is why my skin looks like a lizard’s! There are several reasons to do this type of session indoors:

• The variety will give you something to think about (other than how much you’re hurting).
• It’s good to train at various intensities at various cadences so that in a race you can change cadence if the one you’re using doesn’t feel great.
• You will be a better cyclist if you extend the range of cadence at which you’re comfortable and proficient.

Variable Gear Intervals

Time/Distance Description

20 min. Easy warm-up; vary cadence and include a little time out of the saddle RPE 1

6 × 3 min. Continuous 18-min. effort at steady pace RPE 2
:
– 3 min. high cadence,100–120 rpm, Go as high as you can smoothly go, but keep the effort in your steady zone.
– 3 min. normal time trial cadence
– 3 min. low cadence, 60–70 rpm; stand for the last half of each rep
– Repeat

2 min. Easy spinning RPE 1

6 × 2 min. Continuous 12-min. effort, alternating 1 min. moderately hard RPE 3:
– 1 min. easy RPE 1
– 2 min. high cadence
– 2 min. normal time trial cadence
– 2 min. big gear, Stand for the last half of each rep.
Repeat

4–5 min. Cruise RPE 1
2–3 min. Stretch to complete the hour

Click here for a printable PDF version of the workout.

This workout republished with permission from “One-Hour Workouts: 50 Swim, Bike, and Run Workouts for Busy Athletes” by Scott Molina, Mark Newton, and Michael Jacques. The book is available in bookstores, tri shops, and online.