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Recipes

TriathlEats: Skirt Steak With Roasted Potatoes And Salad

Eat clean after a tough workout with this protein- and nutrient-rich meal.

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Eat clean after a tough workout with this protein- and nutrient-rich meal.

Ingredients

For steak marinade
1 8-ounce skirt steak
¼ cup olive oil
1 tsp garlic, chopped
¼ tsp cumin
1 tsp cilantro, chopped

For salad
1 cup baby arugula
½ cup blanched haricots verts (or green beans)
½ cup cherry tomatoes, halved
1 T thinly sliced green scallion
¼ cup, each, sliced cucumber, sliced red onion, sliced zucchini
1 tsp, each, torn fresh parsley and torn cilantro
Lemon juice, to taste (about half a lemon)
Salt, to taste
Olive oil, to taste

For potatoes
1 cup mixed marble potatoes (or any baby potato)
1 sprig rosemary
Salt, to taste
Olive oil

Directions

Combine all marinade ingredients and marinate steak for two days (or at least three hours). One hour before serving, combine all salad ingredients. Thirty minutes before serving, boil potatoes with salt and whole rosemary sprig until tender. Drain and remove rosemary, lightly crush, then crisp in olive oil for 5 minutes. Grill steak to medium-rare. Assemble all on a plate. Serves 1.

Chef Tip: 
To ensure proper meat prep, Chef Karp recommends making sure the fire on the grill is not too hot (grill the steak over moderate heat). Let the meat rest five minutes before serving.

RELATED – TriathlEats: Marinated Flank Steak

Meet the Triathlete-chef

A life-long chef, Matt Karp opened his own restaurant, Plates, more than 10 years ago to combine his passion for cooking with the ability to control his schedule. “I wanted to be able to come and go when I want and raise my kids and find time to train,” he says. “I could never be a triathlete if I were working for someone else.” The restaurant, in the New York City suburb of Larchmont, is a hybrid of fine dining (lobster, halibut, locally sourced meats) and “hipster cooking” (barbecue, homemade kimchi, homemade pastrami). Karp attended Le Cordon Bleu in Paris and worked around the world under several famous chefs. It was the pressure of the kitchen that drove him into triathlon. Karp’s friend watched the famous Julie Moss Kona crawl on TV in 1982, started racing triathlon because of it, then encouraged his whole group of friends (including Karp) to take up triathlon. He’s been racing for almost a decade and has done five Ironmans. His three daughters are his biggest fans, and Karp and his friends all bring their families to big races for vacations. He plans to focus on racing only half-Ironmans so he can spend more time with his family. “My goal is just to have a well-balanced life,” he says

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