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Nutrition

A 3-Week Meal Plan for Triathletes in 70.3 Training

Not sure what to eat while training for a 70.3? This day-by-day meal plan pairs your nutrition with the workouts in one of our most popular half-iron training plans.

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Training for a half-iron/70.3 triathlon is no small feat, especially when integrated into a busy life. If you are following a training plan to prepare for your race, but unsure what and how much to eat to support the training load, rest assured that you are not alone. Prioritizing intentional daily nutrition to support health and training can be the Achilles heel in endurance training – there’s a reason why they call nutrition the “fourth discipline” of triathlon! Never fret, we’ve got a triathlete’s meal plan for 70.3 training to help you out.

For most busy triathletes, meals are often a last-minute grab-and-go situation, or raiding the pantry for a quick, satisfying snack to fill the belly. Triathletes may have the best intentions for healthy fueling, but when caught in the one-two punch of tired and hangry, all bets are off the table.

To simplify your life and take the guessing game out, we created a basic meal plan to:

  • Help eliminate the unhealthy impulsive food choices (i.e. avoid eating through your kitchen)
  • Outline the macronutrient breakdown and amount needed based on daily training and the cumulative training load
  • Support physical adaptations, recovery, and health

This 70.3 meal plan for triathletes is aligned with Triathlete’s popular Super Simple 70.3 training plan; specifically, weeks 10, 11, and 12 which represent two build weeks followed by a recovery week. This way, you can see how to adjust your meal plan in response to increasing and decreasing training loads.

RELATED: Triathlete’s Complete Guide to Training for a Half-Iron/70.3 Triathlon

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Meal Plan for 70.3 Training: General Guidelines

Keep in mind you are eating to fuel the body, not lose weight or improve body composition. There is a time and place for weight loss, but not in the build training phase of a half-iron distance triathlon.

This 70.3 meal plan is broad and is not designed for a specific age, body weight, body composition, gender, food intolerances and allergies, dietary restrictions, or portion sizes. Athletes are unique, so our macronutrient needs to support training, recovery, and health. You may use the macronutrient guidelines below to personalize your serving sizes; however, if you are unsure how to meet your nutritional training needs or would like help with specific goals such as improving body composition, building fat-burning adaptations, or achieving weight loss in the post-season, seek the advice of a Sports Certified Registered Dietitian (CSSD, RD).

Macronutrient guidelines for athletes

This meal plan for 70.3 training is designed to fulfill the recommended macronutrient guidelines for endurance athletes, which are as follows:

  • Carbohydrate: 3-5g/kg per day (low-intensity, skill-based activity); 5-7g/kg per day (moderate intensity, 1 hour per day); 6-10g/kg per day (moderate to high intensity, 1-3 hours per day)
  • Protein: 1.2-2g/kg per day
  • Fat: 1g/kg/day

Note: 1kg equals 2.2 pounds; use your current weight to calculate your individual needs.

Personalizing your 70.3 meal plan

Frequency

You’ll notice each day includes three meals and two or three snacks. At a glance, you may mistake this meal plan for an open buffet of non-stop consumption. That’s not the case. Balanced snacks are necessary when meals are more than four hours apart to help stabilize blood sugar, maintain energy levels, decrease hunger and cravings, and fill nutritional gaps.

For example, if an athlete wakes at 4:30 a.m. to work out, the breakfast/post workout meal is at 7 a.m., lunch at noon, and dinner at 6:30pm, the mid-morning and afternoon snack are necessary since the meals are 5 or 6.5 hours apart.

As you can see, the timing of your workout(s) dictates the timing of meals and snacks. For example, if the training is early morning (5 a.m.), shortly after waking, a small dose of easy-to-digest carbohydrate (such as the pre-workout snacks listed at the end of this article) will suffice pre-workout, with breakfast as the post-workout fuel after the session. On the other hand, if training is at 4 p.m., a pre-workout snack is needed and possibly a post-workout snack depending on dinner time.

Recovery fuel or snacks are most effective up to 45 min post workout.

Ingredient swaps

When following the meal plan, remember the components of each meal can be substituted according to your preference. For example, if the meal calls for broccoli and you are not a fan, no problem! Simply refer to the veggie list below and swap it out. Adjust portion sizes to meet your individual needs.

The same principle applies to snacks – if you don’t like the snack listed in the meal plan, swap it out with one of the snack options listed at the end of this article.

Hydration

Hydrate with at least 16 ounces of water at meals and 8 ounces at snacks. You should also be hydrating throughout the day—even on rest days or days when your training load is low.

Sports Nutrition

Sports fueling and hydration are a key element in your overall daily nutrition, but because sports fueling is highly individual, it is not included in this meal plan. Instead, please use your sports nutrition of choice for all training sessions.

For more on building your sports nutrition training and racing plan, go to these links:

For now, we will focus on daily nutrition broken out as meals and snacks. 

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Meal Plan for 70.3 Training: Week 10 (Build Focus)

A triathlete follows a meal plan for 70.3 triathlon training
(Photo: Getty Images)

This meal plan for triathlon training corresponds with Week 10 of Triathlete’s Super Simple 70.3 Plan, which represents a second cumulative week of a build focus in this training plan. By the end of this week, fatigue may be accumulating depending on management of life stress, sleep, nutrition, hydration, and recovery. Consistent and proactive refueling is critical to offset overreaching, chronic fatigue and ensure positive physical adaptions from training. 

Monday

Rest day

Just because today is off from training doesn’t mean you should restrict calories and intake. It takes up to 24 hours to restock glycogen stores and 12 hours to restock the liver with fuel. So use today as an opportunity to adequately recover from previous training and fuel up for tomorrow’s session. 

Breakfast 2 slices whole-grain toast, 2/4 egg omelet (2 white and 2 whole eggs) with veggies of choice
Mid-Morning Snack 4-6 oz Greek yogurt with 1/4 cup berries
Lunch Large bowl with kale, 1 cup chopped sweet potato, 1 oz goat cheese, 4 oz chicken, 1/2 cup broccoli, drizzle of choice dressing
Mid-Afternoon Snack 1-2 tbsp nut butter, banana or apple slices
Dinner 1 cup cooked brown rice, 4-5 oz meat of choice, steamed veggies drizzled with olive oil

Tuesday

Bike 50 minutes with 5×3-minute hard efforts scattered

*Depending on the time of day this workout occurs will dictate the timing of snacks/meals. (See below) 

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 1/2-3/4 cup oatmeal (dry), 6-8 oz milk, 2 tbsp chopped nuts, honey, cinnamon; 1-2 eggs (cooked to preference)
Mid-morning snack 4-6 dried figs and 1-2 hard-boiled eggs
Lunch Turkey and cheese sandwich or wrap with lettuce, tomato, pretzels and hummus
Mid-Afternoon Snack 1/2 cup cottage cheese with fresh fruit
Dinner Medium baked potato, 1 tbsp butter, cooked carrots and green beens with olive oil, 4-5 oz grilled fish (or protein of choice)

Wednesday:

Swim 1,400 yards total. Main set: 8 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 1 mile easy, 6 x 800m at 5K race pace with 400m jog recoveries, 1 mile easy.

On days with two training sessions, it’s essential to fuel and hydrate in and around workouts to support positive adaptations and recovery. In addition, the speed work in today’s run requires an intentional post-workout snack with protein and simple sugar within 45 min, if possible. 

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 2 slices toast with butter or nut butter, 6 oz Greek yogurt, 3/4 cup berries
Mid-morning snack Cheese slice(s) on crackers
Lunch Grilled cheese sandwich, 8 oz milk, pretzels, apple
Mid-Afternoon Snack (or 90 min pre-run) 10-12 vanilla wafers with 1 tbsp peanut or nut butter
Dinner Grilled chicken sandwich on a whole-grain bun, side salad, 8 oz milk
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk or 1/2 to 3/4 cup cottage cheese

Thursday

Bike 40 minutes moderate + 18 minutes comfortably hard.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Breakfast 2 waffles, drizzle of maple syrup, 2-3 scrambled eggs (2 whites + 1 whole), 8 oz milk, 3/4 cup berries
Mid-morning snack 1/2 cup cottage cheese or Greek yogurt with fruit
Lunch Grilled chicken sandwich with pita chips, carrot sticks, hummus
Mid-Afternoon Snack Apple slices and small handful of nuts
Dinner 1/2 cup black beans, grilled salmon, 1/2 cup cooked cheese grits with salsa verde

Friday

Swim 1,400 yards total. Main set: 2 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 5.5 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.

With two sessions today and a long ride tomorrow, prioritize carbohydrates, protein (after the sessions), and hydration today.

*Dinner both tonight and tomorrow night are prime opportunities to test drive your pre-race dinner. 

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Breakfast 1/2-3/4 cup oatmeal, 20g protein powder or 3 eggs (2 white + 1 whole)
Mid-morning snack Pretzels with nut butter
Lunch Turkey and cheese on sourdough bread, 1-2 servings of pita chips, and 1-2 tbsp hummus
Mid-Afternoon Snack Granola bar (low-fiber, moderate protein)
Dinner 1-3 cups white rice, 4 oz sirloin (lean cut), cooked carrots

Saturday:

Bike 55 miles moderate.

Breakfast or the pre-ride meal is a prime opportunity to test drive your race-day breakfast.

The evening of a long workout and the evening of successive long training days, topping off with a carbohydrate/protein snack 30-60 minutes before bed helps facilitate recovery and supports sleep, especially from dairy due to the slow release of casein protein.

Breakfast Bagel with nut butter and jelly, banana, small non-fat Greek yogurt (or 1-2 hard-boiled eggs)
Post-ride snack 25g protein shake, small piece of banana bread
Lunch Chicken wrap on a flour tortilla with hummus, lettuce, tomato, provolone cheese, with pita chips or pretzels
Mid-Afternoon Snack Applesauce or Jell-O with string cheese
Dinner Cheese pizza slices, salad with iceberg lettuce, cucumbers and tomatoes, drizzled with choice dressing
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk or 1/2 to 3/4 cup cottage cheese

Sunday:

Run 13 miles moderate. | Swim 2,000 yards total. Main set: 1,500 time trial.

Breakfast or the pre-swim/run meal is a prime opportunity to test drive your race-day breakfast.

With two sessions today, prioritize carbohydrates, protein (after the sessions), and proper hydration.

Breakfast (pre-swim or run) 1/2 cup oatmeal or 1-2 slices of toast with 1 tbsp peanut butter and jelly; small greek yogurt, 1 banana
Post-workout snack 12 oz chocolate milk, small biscuit with jelly
Lunch Bowl with lettuce, quinoa, goat cheese, grilled veggies, tempeh, choice dressing; side of pita bread
Mid-Afternoon Snack Apple slices and Greek yogurt
Dinner Chicken quesadilla, 1 cup black bean soup, 1 serving tortilla chips and salsa
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk
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Meal Plan for 70.3 Training: Week 11 (Build Focus)

Athletes eat after a workout following a meal plan for triathletes
(Photo: Getty Images)

This triathlete’s meal plan for 70.3 training corresponds with Week 11 of the Super Simple training schedule, and represents a third cumulative week of a build focus in this training plan. Be mindful of energy levels, mood, and how your body feels as you progress through this week’s training. Bring awareness to how you manage life stress, sleep, nutrition, hydration, and recovery. Consistent and proactive refueling is critical to offset overreaching, chronic fatigue and ensure positive physical adaptions from training. 

Monday

Rest day

Just because today is rest from training doesn’t mean you should restrict calories and overall intake. It takes up to 24 hours to restock glycogen stores and 12 hours to restock the liver with fuel. Use today as an opportunity to adequately recover from previous training and fuel up for tomorrow’s session

Breakfast 2/4 egg omelet (2 white, two whole eggs) with veggies of choice, 2 slices toast, side of fruit
Mid-morning snack Small Greek yogurt with 1/4 cup berries
Lunch Large salad with mixed lettuce, 1/4 cup black beans, 1 oz shredded mozzarella, 1/4 cup edamame, 2 oz chicken or tofu, 1/4 cup broccoli, 1/4 cup pita chips, drizzled with dressing of choice
Mid-Afternoon Snack 1-2 tbsp nut butter, apple slices or banana
Dinner Baked sweet potato, 4 oz chicken or fish, steamed veggies drizzled with olive oil

Tuesday

Bike 55 minutes with 4 x 4-minute hard efforts scattered.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast Smoothie with 1 scoop protein powder, 8 oz milk, small muffin
Mid-morning snack Small Greek yogurt
Lunch Chicken salad with 1-2 slices sourdough bread, 1 bowl veggie soup, side of red grapes
Mid-Afternoon Snack Carrot sticks with hummus, 1 oz salted mixed nuts
Dinner Stir fry with 4 oz chicken, broccoli, brown rice with an orange

Wednesday

Swim 1,500 yards total. Main set: 10 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 1 mile easy, 5 x 1,000m at 5K race pace with 400m jog recoveries, 1 mile easy.

On days with two training sessions, it’s important to fuel and hydrate in and around workouts to support positive adaptations and recovery. In addition, the speed work in today’s run requires an intentional post-workout snack with protein and simple sugar within 45 minutes, if possible.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 6 oz Greek yogurt, 1-2 slices sourdough bread with 1-2 tbsp nut butter, 1/2 cup oatmeal, drizzle of honey or maple syrup
Mid-morning snack Handful of salted nuts
Lunch Cheeseburger and tomato soup, side of fruit
Mid-Afternoon Snack Steamed, salted edamame
Dinner 4 oz pork tenderloin, small baked potato, grilled vegetable medley
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk or 4-6 oz Greek yogurt

Thursday:

Bike 40 minutes moderate + 20 minutes comfortably hard.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 2 Kodiak protein pancakes drizzled with maple syrup, 1 hard-boiled egg, bowl of berries
Mid-morning snack Rice cake with 2 tbsp nut butter
Lunch Grilled chicken Caesar salad with cheese, croutons, veggies; one slice sourdough bread with butter
Mid-Afternoon Snack Small Greek yogurt or 1/2 cup cottage cheese
Dinner Stir fry chicken with broccoli, red/green bell peppers, rice noodles

Friday

Swim 1,500 yards total. Main set: 3 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 6 miles moderate + 4 x 10-second hill sprints.

With two sessions today and a long ride tomorrow, prioritize carbohydrates, protein (after the sessions), and hydration today.

*Dinner both tonight and tomorrow night are prime opportunities to test drive your pre-race dinner.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 1/2 cup oatmeal, 2/4 egg omelet (2 white + 1-2 whole eggs) with veggies and cheese
Mid-morning snack 1 tbsp nut butter, 1 banana
Lunch Turkey and cheese sandwich with lettuce and tomato; one serving chips, handful of grapes
Mid-Afternoon Snack 1 serving graham crackers with 1 tbsp peanut or nut butter
Dinner Spaghetti with lean ground beef, tomato sauce, and side of bread; Side salad with iceberg lettuce, cucumbers, and tomatoes, drizzled with dressing of choice

Saturday:

Bike 60 miles moderate + 10-minute transition run at race pace.

Breakfast or the pre-ride meal is a prime opportunity to test drive your race-day breakfast.

The evening of a long workout and the evening of successive long training days, topping off with a carbohydrate/protein snack 30-60 min before bed helps facilitate recovery and supports sleep, especially from dairy due to the slow release of casein protein.

Breakfast (pre-ride meal) 1 bagel with 1 tbsp nut butter and jelly, 1 banana, small non-fat Greek yogurt
Post-workout snack Blueberry-Peanut Butter smoothie (frozen blueberries, 1/2 frozen banana, 8 oz milk, 1 tbsp peanut butter, drizzle of maple syrup, blended)
Lunch Bowl of mac-and-cheese, side of edamame
Mid-Afternoon Snack Granola bar (low in fiber, moderate protein)
Dinner Baked chicken breast with mozzarella cheese, tomatoes, rice
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk

Sunday:

Run 14 miles moderate. | Swim 2,200 yards moderate.

Breakfast or the pre-ride meal is a prime opportunity to test drive your race-day breakfast.

The evening of a long workout and the evening of successive long training days, topping off with a carbohydrate/protein snack 30-60 minutes before bed helps facilitate recovery and supports sleep, especially from dairy due to the slow release of casein protein.

Breakfast (pre-swim or run) 1/2 to 1 bagel with 1 tbsp nut butter, drizzle of honey, medium banana
Post-workout snack 6-8 oz Greek vanilla yogurt, 1/2 cup cinnamon granola
Lunch Chicken quesadilla with tomatoes, 1/2 cup black beans, mild salsa; one serving salted tortilla chips
Mid-Afternoon Snack 8 oz milk with handful of red grapes
Dinner 4-5 oz sirloin steak, baked potato with cheese, spinach salad with almond slivers, veggies, and choice dressing
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk or 1/2 to 3/4 cup cottage cheese
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Meal Plan for 70.3 Training: Week 12 (Recovery Focus)

A man follows a triathlete meal plan for 70.3 training
(Photo: Getty Images)

This week’s meal plan for 70.3 training aligns with Week 12 of the Super Simple 70.3 schedule. Despite pulling back on intensity and duration, the week’s training still includes hard efforts and endurance sessions. Overall, it’s simply a small reprieve from the build focus. Therefore, daily nutrition will continue to align with each day and follow day’s training to ensure you are adequately fueled, recovered and prepared for the last build up to race day.

Monday:

Rest

After three weeks of a focused build in this training cycle, today’s rest is an opportunity to restock glycogen and liver stores with fuel and repair muscle tissue. Additionally, use today as an opportunity to adequately recover from the previous three weeks of training and capitalize on your hard-earned fitness as you inch closer to race day.

Breakfast 6 oz Greek yogurt, 1-2 hard-boiled eggs, 1 slice toast, bowl mixed berries
Mid-morning snack 1 tbsp peanut butter, medium banana
Lunch Asian chicken salad with romaine, cilantro, toasted almonds, sesame seeds, wonton strips, sesame vinagrette; small baguette on side
Mid-Afternoon Snack 1 oz salted almonds
Dinner 4-5 oz grilled salmon, 1/2-1 cup brown rice, grilled asparagus

Tuesday:

Bike 45 minutes with 5 x 2-minute hard efforts scattered.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 1-2 servings cold cereal with 6-8 oz milk, strawberries, and 2 hard-boiled eggs
Mid-morning snack Cheese stick, 1 oz nuts
Lunch Wrap with grilled chicken, lettuce, tomato, cheese and side of pretzels
Mid-Afternoon Snack Hummus with carrot and celery sticks
Dinner Pasta with pesto, edamame, mixed veggies, parmesan cheese, 3 oz protein of choice (chicken, tofu, salmon, shrimp)

Wednesday:

Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 6 x 75 sprints, RI = 20 seconds. | Run 2 miles easy, 1 miles at 10K race pace, 2 miles easy.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 1/2 cup oatmeal with pecans, cinnamon, drizzle of honey or maple syrup; 2 scrambled eggs, 8 oz milk
Mid-morning snack Hummus with cauliflower florets and carrot sticks
Lunch Peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole-grain bread with small Greek yogurt, 1 apple
Mid-Afternoon Snack Steamed and salted edamame in pods
Dinner Lettuce wraps with grilled chicken, romaine lettuce, cabbage, carrots, cashew pieces, chow mein noodles, mandarin oranges, drizzled with peanut dressing; side of rice
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk

Thursday:

Bike 40 minutes moderate + 10 minutes comfortably hard.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 6 oz Greek yogurt, 1/2 cup granola, handful of raspberries
Mid-morning snack 1 oz cheese and crackers
Lunch Fish tacos with cojita cheese, lime crema
Mid-Afternoon Snack Steamed and salted edamame in pods
Dinner Shrimp and broccoli stir-fry with broccoli and brown rice, cooked in olive oil and mixed with honey, soy sauce, ginger, garlic

Friday:

Swim 1,300 yards total. Main set: 2 x 300 yards race pace, RI = 30 seconds. | Run 5 miles moderate.

With two sessions today and a long ride tomorrow, prioritize carbohydrates, protein (after the sessions), and hydration today.

*Dinner both tonight and tomorrow night are prime opportunities to test drive your pre-race dinner.

Pre-workout (if early AM session) 20-25 g pre-workout carbohydrates (see list below)
Post-workout or Breakfast 2 slices whole wheat bread, 2 tbsp nut butter, 2 tsp honey, 1 banana, 1/2 tsp ground cinnamon; 8 oz milk
Mid-morning snack 1/2 cup cottage cheese with fruit
Lunch Small Margherita flatbread pizza, small bowl gazpacho
Mid-Afternoon Snack 1 oz cheese with crackers
Dinner Turkey or beef burger with tomato, spinach, avocado

Saturday:

Bike 45 miles moderate.

Breakfast or the pre-ride meal is a prime opportunity to test drive your race-day breakfast.

The evening of a long workout and the evening of successive long training days, topping off with a carbohydrate/protein snack 30-60 minutes before bed helps facilitate recovery and supports sleep, especially from dairy, due to the slow release of casein protein.

Breakfast English muffin egg sandwich, a small bowl of oatmeal, 1/2 banana
Post-ride snack 6 oz Greek yogurt, 1-2 slices bread with 1/2 tbsp nut butter
Lunch Peanut butter and jelly sandwich on whole-grain bread with small Greek yogurt and 3/4 cup strawberries
Mid-Afternoon Snack Trail mix (nuts with dried fruit)
Dinner Grilled chicken, baked potato, steamed carrots, 1/2 cup applesauce, white roll with butter
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk or 1/2 to 3/4 cup cottage cheese

Sunday:

Run 10 miles moderate. | Swim 2,000 yards moderate.

Breakfast or the pre-ride meal is a prime opportunity to test drive your race-day breakfast.

The evening of a long workout and the evening of successive long training days, topping off with a carbohydrate/protein snack 30-60 minutes before bed helps facilitate recovery and supports sleep, especially from dairy, due to the slow release of casein protein.

Breakfast 2 waffles with nut butter, drizzled with maple syrup; 1 small Greek yogurt
Post-workout snack Chicken biscuit, 8 oz milk
Lunch Cheese quesadilla, black bean soup with a sprinkle of cheese, 1 serving tortilla chips and salsa
Mid-Afternoon Snack Pita chips and hummus
Dinner Roasted chicken and veggies (mushrooms, broccoli, sliced peppers, cauliflower)
Bedtime snack 8 oz milk or 4 oz greek yogurt

Options and Swaps

Pre-workout quick hits (30 min or less before workout):

Small portion of sports gummies
12 oz sports drink
One sports Gel
1 -1.5 Graham cracker
10 Saltine crackers
½ cup applesauce
One medium banana
One slice of sourdough toast/bread

Pre-workout snacks (up to 90 min before session):

1-2 rice cakes with 1 tbsp nut butter, 1 tbsp honey or maple syrup or Jelly, one banana
8-10 crackers with 1 tbsp nut butter
English muffin or two slices of sourdough bread with 1 tbsp nut butter and jelly
One packet of sports gummies
100-240 calorie sports bar
A handful of pretzels with 1 tbsp nut butter
100-120 calorie sports drink (25-30g carbohydrates)

Post-workout snacks

15-25g protein and 1 to 1.2g CHO/kg body weight, 16-24oz fluid) within 45 min of a workout to optimize recovery and positive training adaptations.

For long and intense sessions, the recovery window extends to the first four hours to take advantage of restocking glycogen, healing damaged muscles, and decreasing overall physical stress. For the first four hours, aim for 1-1.2 g carbohydrate per kg body weight, and 15-25g protein per hour.

6 oz Greek Yogurt, ½ cup granola, 1 cup berries
20g protein powder, 8 oz milk, English muffin
Bagel w/cream cheese or nut butter, and jelly/honey as desired
3/4 cup cottage cheese with strawberries and toast

When to skip the post-workout snack?

Not every workout needs a post-workout snacks. You can forego the snack on days that you have one session a day, or you have a long recovery between two workouts, your workouts are under 75 minutes and low to moderate intensity, or you can have a meal within 45 minutes.

Healthy (in moderation) dessert options

You don’t have to deprive yourself of dessert! If you’ve got a sweet tooth, try one of these healthy options:

1 cup strawberries with 1 oz Dark Chocolate (70+% cocoa).
1 oz Dark Chocolate (70+%) and a glass of milk.
Applesauce
Pudding
Yogurt parfait
Small cup ice cream
Frozen berries with vanilla yogurt
Greek yogurt frozen bar
Popsicle

Susan Kitchen is a Sports Certified Registered Dietitian, USA Triathlon and Ironman Certified Coach, accomplished endurance athlete, and published author. She is the owner of Race Smart, an endurance coaching and performance nutrition company that works with athletes across the globe as they strive toward optimal health, fitness, and performance.