Gear

What Our Editors Used and Loved in November

Win one of our editors' favorites.

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Every month our editors and staff spend lots of time doing triathlon and triathlon-adjacent things. Yes, we test the newest gear, but we’re only human—we also have our old favorites and go-tos, and weird quirks. So each month, we share our favorite tri-related things right now and members can enter to win one of our editors’ picks.

This month, it’s all about the winter gear and members have two chances to win: enter to win a Oiselle flyout wool long sleeve or an InsideTracker testEnter by Dec. 15 and two winners will be picked at random. Check back next month for new picks.

Oiselle Flyout Wool Long Sleeve

It’s getting cold around these parts. And “these parts” are Arizona, so “cold” is really, like, 30 degrees F at night and 70 degrees in the afternoon. The desert is weird and wild, and one must dress accordingly. That’s why I’m a big fan of the Oiselle Flyout Wool Long Sleeve running shirt—it’s warm enough to keep you comfy in the early miles of your run, but light enough that you won’t overheat. Also, I’m now of the firm belief that thumb loops and a “watch window” should be mandatory on all long-sleeve running tops.

– Susan Lacke, digital editor

MEMBERS: Enter here to win a Oiselle Flyout Wool Long Sleeve

InsideTracker

While InsideTracker might seem like the latest cool thing that all (OK, *some*) of the pros are posting about on social media, it turns out it’s actually been around for more than 10 years and was founded in 2009. But, for many in the endurance world, it’s just come onto our radar as seemingly more and more people post about their testing and results. Having jumped into the testing pool myself, I’ve been so impressed with the whole set-up. For the uninitiated, you can pick a plan, sign up for testing, have your blood drawn, and then your results are returned, typically within a week or so. It is not cheap (the Ultimate test costs $589, while the Essentials costs $189), but it is most definitely thorough. You get the inside scoop on what’s happening with 43 different biomarkers (with the Ultimate) or 12 (with the Essentials test). Finding out how your training and recovery are impacting things like inflammation, hormones, vitamins, glucose, and lipids can be a real eye-opener and can help you shape your plan going forwards. For anyone remotely interested in their own data (isn’t that all triathletes?!), InsideTracker is likely going to become your new favorite thing.

– Emma-Kate Lidbury, managing editor

MEMBERS: Enter here to win an InsideTracker test

Castelli Perfetto Light Glove

OK, bear with me on this one. Yes, these are excellent cycling gloves for like the 45-60 degree F range, but in my experience with this pair, they actually excel more while running. As someone who ran in college in Central Pennsylvania, I can attest that I have experienced some of the most horrifying running conditions, on a daily basis, with no opportunity to “take a day off” or “hit the treadmill.” As such, I’ve been in near-constant search for running gloves that fight the wind, the rain (which is worse than snow, trust me), overheating, and lack of dexterity.

Only recently did I accidentally stumble on these ultra thin, but wildly weather-resistant cycling gloves, and just happen to use them running. I’ve run in them in soaking conditions, I’ve run in them in 15-degree-and-windy conditions, and I’ve even run in them in 45-degree-and-warming-up-fast conditions. Every time I’m literally shocked at how well they work. And the fact that they’re crazy crazy thin means you could actually pack these in many running shorts’ nutrition pockets if you needed to don or doff them during a run. It’s nice to know you only need one pair of running gloves for literally everything you could ever encounter, but it’s confusing that they’re cycling gloves. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

– Chris Foster, executive editor

Velocio Signature Softshell Jacket

Last year, when I was testing out winter cycling clothes, Velocio sent me this jacket and I wasn’t totally sure what to do with it. Is “jacket” really the right word? It’s more like a thick jersey. Does anything even fit underneath it? Do I want to ride in conditions that require this level of clothing?

It turns out, no, I do not want to ride those conditions. But I will cross-country ski. And this jacket’s ended up being my go-to for winter sports. Besides the fact that Velocio makes really nice, high-end stuff that makes me feel cool, the jacket is perfect for throwing over a base layer and staying very, very warm. (Way too warm for running, don’t do it.) Put a light layer underneath and you’ll be good for a chilly day biking, or put a warm layer underneath and you’ll be toasty in freezing temperatures. And the thing about cross-country skiing is that it’s always freezing temperatures—hence, the snow—so getting and staying warm is my ongoing struggle. The skiers may not know it yet, but great cycling clothes are clutch, and they have pockets.

Kelly O’Mara, editor-in-chief