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2013 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Run Compression

Five run compression garments from the 2013 Triathlete Buyer's Guide.

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The 2013 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide magazine is out on newsstands now (and check out the digital version), and we’re giving you a sneak peek right here. Check out the run compression section from the guide below and check back to Triathlete.com for more Buyer’s Guide content.

CW-X Pro Tight

$110, Cw-x.com
The draw: Moderate support, plenty of flex to run

The crisscross webbing on these training tights helps cradle and stabilize key muscles and joints during long runs. Our tester wore them through a full marathon race and noticed a real difference—they subtly lifted and compressed muscles from the hip to the calf without chafing or creating any hotspots.

RELATED: How Compression Apparel Works

Zoot Recovery 2.0 CRx Tight

$160, Zootsports.com
The draw: Sturdy recovery-only tights

These post-workout/race tights feature reinforced compression patches over the quads, hamstrings and calves for a targeted recovery effect. These tights are longer than others, covering half of the foot, which creates a snug, wrapping feel. They are more difficult to get on and off due to the longer leg, but not so much to deter use. The long leg catches at the heel so there’s no harsh elastic ring around the ankle when you take them off.

RELATED – Under Pressure: Does Compression Apparel Work?

CEP Classic Sock

$60, Cep-sports.com
The draw: All-purpose compression, for a race to a workday

As a division of Medi, a medical compression company, CEP is a leader in athletic compression technology. The Classic running sock is said to prevent a variety of run-induced injuries as well as cramps. The pressure and support was noticeable. If you’re looking for a little flair, they’re also available in white, pink and green.

RELATED – Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Running Upgrades

2XU Tri Short

$130, 2xu.com
The draw: Outstanding race short plus quad support

This short (matching sin- glet also $130) is intended for all race distances, although the chamois may be a bit thin for an iron-distance ride. The Lycra blend fabric offers a little much-needed support to the quad muscles at the end of a long run. Two small rear pockets are useful for stashing gels.

RELATED – 2013 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Running Shoes

RecoFit Sleeve

$45, Recofit.com
The draw: Minimally compressive, but breathable

Developed and manufactured in the multisport hub of Boulder, Colo., these sleeves are made of a carbon yarn and Lycra-spandex blend that feels dramatically more breathable than typical compression garments, such as CEP’s Classic Sock. The sleeves slide on with ease, but they offer a more subtle sensation of muscle com- pression than other apparel in this roundup.

RELATED: Do Compression Socks Really Work?

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