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Reviewed: Louis Garneau TRI-400 Shoes

This tri shoe, thanks to its Boa closure system, allows you to quickly fine-tune your fit.

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This tri shoe, thanks to its Boa closure system, allows you to quickly fine-tune your fit.

Triathlon cycling shoes generally employ one tried-and-true type of closure system: a wide Velcro strap at the opening of the shoe with a smaller strap toward the toes. However, Louis Garneau breaks from tradition with the Tri-400, which uses Boa’s IP1 dial to lock down the mid-foot, creating a triathlon shoe that rivals top-end cycling shoes in comfort and security.

The top strap has a reverse Velcro closure, so it closes toward the inside of the shoe. It’s offset in a way that molds to the curve of your foot so it doesn’t pinch or rub. But the real highlight of the shoe is the Boa dial, which can spin bidirectionally to loosen or tighten, effectively tailoring the fit with a simplistic and convenient design.

The carbon outsole feels incredibly stiff and has vents to allow air to flow in and water to drain out. The insoles are also ventilated, making this shoe ready for hot weather when combined with the mesh inserts on the upper. With a claimed weight of 235 grams, the Tri-400 is 45 grams lighter than the Specialized S-Works Trivent, which also uses a Boa dial and costs $75 more. While there are only a handful of more expensive shoes, there are even fewer that rival the Tri-400 in comfort and performance.

Louis Garneau TRI-400 Shoes
$325 Louisgarneau.com

RELATED – 2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Cycling Shoes