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Back In Action: 3 Recovery Tools

A trio of recovery products to have you rebounding stronger, faster.

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A trio of recovery products to have you rebounding stronger, faster.

Compex Sport Elite

$849, Shopcompex.com

The makers of this top-end muscle stimulator device, which is intended for competitive athletes who regularly put their bodies through rigorous training, say it can help build resistance to muscle fatigue by boosting slow-twitch muscle fibers—a claim that should appeal to any long-distance triathlete. In addition to building muscle endurance, it can aid in recovery by pumping out lactic acid from muscles after a tough workout or race so you’re less sore and can rebound quicker. This model features nine programs, which address everything from muscle warm-up to strength building to active recovery. The four electrode panels are easy to affix, and the interface is simple to navigate.

RELATED: 5 Recovery Techniques From Triathlons

TheraPearl Shin Wrap

$25, Therapearl.com

Much more effective and less messy than a frozen bag of mixed vegetables, the TheraPearl therapy products are our new favorites for dealing with post-workout muscle soreness. The wraps, which are available for a variety of aches and pains, can be chilled in the freezer or heated depending on the type of therapy you need. Each one wraps around and attaches with Velcro so you don’t have to hold it in place while it does its job, and they’re compact enough to wear under clothing. We liked the shin wrap for dealing with shin splints and calf soreness, and the knee wrap came in handy to keep swelling down after a minor bike crash.

RELATED: Rethinking Ice Baths And Ibuprofen

Swiftwick Medical Recovery+ socks

$70, Swiftwick.com

While $70 may seem like a lot of money for a pair of socks, the fabrication process of these explains the higher price tag. Constructed from a material called Repreve, these socks are made from recycled materials and don’t use any dyes, which helps reduce the environmental impact of their production. Swiftwick also built in an antimicrobial treatment, reinforced heel pocket, technical toe bed and moisture management properties. The compression level is on par with other socks in the category, but the lack of seams is a beneficial feature because when you take them off, there are no lines or patterns imprinted on your skin. The material is light yet strong and isn’t too thick to make you feel hot, which is key if you wear them on a plane or to bed.

Recovery Tip: Fueling properly after training is just as important—eat a snack with three to four parts carbohydrate to one part protein within 30–45 minutes of finishing your workout.

More recovery advice.