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2015 Triathlete Buyer’s Guide: Beginner Run Essentials

The gear you’ll need for your second transition and the final leg of triathlon.

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Look for a pair of sunglasses that are snug, comfortable and provide plenty of coverage. Make sure you’re OK with your purchase receiving a bit of the rapid wear and tear that often comes with the rigors of the run segment. These lightweight Tifosi Talos Sunglasses ($70, Tifosioptics.com) answer all those needs without breaking the bank.
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Gone are the days when a GPS-enabled watch means wearing a computer-sized device on your wrist. Grab an affordable and stylish watch, like the Timex Run X20, to make sure you’re pushing hard—but not beyond your limits—as you start the run leg of the race.
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To ensure that you’re hydrated to the finish line, it’s smart to carry a water bottle, such as the Camelbak Arc Quick Grip ($20, Camelbak.com). Fill it with your nutrition drink of choice, or stick with water and use the handy pocket to carry a gel or chews. This lightweight bottle hugs your hand, leaving your focus on the course.
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Even in a sprint-distance triathlon, keeping up on nutrition will be key to a successful race. Look for something with carbohydrates and electrolytes that is easy to digest, such as GU Energy Gels. The gels are available in 15 different flavors, so you can satisfy your taste buds while getting in the proper calories.
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Pinning a race number to your tri kit doesn’t work well (soggy bib, anyone?), making race belts a must. The Amphipod Race-Lite Number Belt ($10, Amphipod.com) is lighter than other belts, is easy to attach and doesn’t have any small parts, which can easily be lost.

When you’re starting out in the sport, comfort in a running shoe is key. Cramped or tired feet can distract from the task of running on tired legs. At 9.1 ounces for women and 10.9 ounces for men, the Brooks Glycerin 12 blends support and speed, and its cushioning will ease the stress on your joints.

Make it your T2 goal to stay calm and transition fast—without fumbling with your shoelaces. Tieless laces, such as the Speedlaces iBungee Stretch Laces ($5.95, Speedlaces.com), make rapid shoe swaps a breeze, and the latex fabric and fastening system allow for quick tension adjustments.