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Top 10 Safest and Most Dangerous Cities for Cyclists

See where your city ranks in the safest cities for cycling in the USA.

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See where your city ranks in the safest cities for cycling in the USA.

California cyclists, you’re in luck. According to an analysis by home security company ADT, six of the top-10 safest cities for bikes are located in The Golden State. The study, which compiled cycling-related data of 790 cities in all 50 states, provides a listing of the safest—and most dangerous—places to ride a bike in America.

To determine who topped the list, analysists compiled data from several organizations, including the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and The League of American Bicyclists. Metrics included number of bike lanes, number of fatal crashes, and legislative measures to protect cyclists in each city. These metrics were combined to create a point score, then ranked.

The top 10 safest cities for cycling:
1. Davis, California
2. Berkeley, California
3. Boulder, Colorado
4. Eugene, Oregon
5. Palo Alto, California
6. Chico, California
7. Mountain View, California
8. Fort Collins, Colorado
9. Santa Barbara, California
10. New Haven, Connecticut

The 10 most dangerous cities for cyclists:
1. Los Angeles, California
2. New York City, New York
3. Webster City, Iowa
4. Jamestown, North Dakota
5. Fargo, North Dakota
6. Houston, Texas
7. Waterloo, Iowa
8. Sioux City, Iowa
9. Johnston, Iowa
10. Des Moines, Iowa

In addition to the top-ten lists, ADT provided a listing of the safest city in each state on its website, Your Local Security.

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