Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Become a Member

Get access to more than 30 brands, premium video, exclusive content, events, mapping, and more.

Already have an account? Sign In

Brands

News

Potts, Haskins Top Field At Capital Of Texas Triathlon

For access to all of our training, gear, and race coverage, plus exclusive training plans, FinisherPix photos, event discounts, and GPS apps, sign up for Outside+.

Potts, Haskins each earn $12,500 for winning the second event in the Race to the Toyota Cup.

Professional triathlete Andy Potts lives by the credo of be a leader, not a follower. That belief kept Potts on course Monday during the Capital of Texas Triathlon, and it certainly helped him to a victory in the event.

Potts, a former All-America swimmer for the University of Michigan and a 2004 Olympic triathlete, was among the leaders of the swim leg when a race volunteer on a jet ski misdirected other competitors at the turnaround buoy. The mistake caused those competitors to swim an extra 200 yards or so on the 1.5-kilometer course laid out in Lady Bird Lake.

However, Potts, who had studied the course on Sunday night, made a decision to turn right at the yellow buoy, as he had been instructed during the pre-race meeting. That move gained him valuable time on other top entrants and allowed him eventually to finish first in the Cap Tex Tri by 18 seconds, with a total time of 1 hour, 52 minutes and 2 seconds.

Potts earned $12,500 for winning the second event in the Race to the Toyota Cup — a seven-triathlon national series that kicked off in Miami Beach, Fla., last month. Sarah Haskins, also of Colorado Springs, won the women’s race in the Toyota Cup competition, likewise pocketing $12,500. She has won the first two events in the 2011 series, which features the Olympic triathlon set-up of a 1.5K swim, a 40K bike leg and a closing 10K run.

“It was getting a little warm out there,” said Haskins, whose time was 1:59:35. “Especially on the run. I was thinking, ‘Please don’t let me have a meltdown.’ You never know what’s going to happen. You can be a mile from the finish and just have a meltdown.”

Read more: American-Statesman