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Brent Poulsen Tests Positive For A Banned Substance

The Canadian will face a two-year period of ineligibility.

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According to the WTC, Canadian Brent Poulsen tested positive for a banned substance at Ironman 70.3 Muncie on July 9, 2011. Poulsen blames the positive test on a prescribed treatment. He will face a two-year period of ineligibility.

See the complete news release below:

Today, World Triathlon Corporation (WTC) announced that Canadian athlete Brent Poulsen, residing in Fort Worth tested positive for a prohibited substance and has accepted a suspension for a doping offense.

Poulsen was tested by WTC at the Affresh Ironman 70.3 Muncie on July 9, 2011. The sample resulted in an Adverse Analytical Finding for testosterone and/or its precursors, which are prohibited in the class of Anabolic Agents on the World Anti-Doping Agency Prohibited List that has been adopted by the World Triathlon Corporation Anti-Doping Rules (“WTC Rules”).

Poulsen accepted a two-year period of ineligibility; beginning on July 9, 2011, the date the sample was collected. As a result of the doping violation, Poulsen has also been disqualified from all competitive results achieved at and subsequent to July 9, 2011, including forfeiture of any medals, points and prizes.

“First and foremost, I want to apologize to my sponsors, fellow athletes, family and friends,” said Poulsen. “My positive test was caused by my use of a prescribed treatment. I had contacted anti-doping authorities, including WTC and the Canadian Centre for Ethics in Sport (“CCES”), to inquire regarding a possible Therapeutic Use Exemption (“TUE”), but regret that I failed to see that process through and heed their warnings before continuing to compete without an approved TUE.”

“As athletes we are 100% responsible for what we put in our bodies and the resulting consequences for our actions,” continued Poulsen. “I hope my fellow competitors will consider my situation and recognize the importance of being accountable to the Anti-Doping Rules.”

“This case illustrates the importance of athletes taking responsibility for the rules established to protect the integrity of competition,” said Andrew Messick, Chief Executive Officer of WTC. “WTC will continue to work with our athletes and race organizers to ensure the fundamental values of fair play and healthy living are preserved.”

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