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A Ventum for the Masses?

Downtube h8ers rejoice!

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Downtube h8ers rejoice! The funky-framed brand just launched a new range of price points for its ‘Z’ line, starting at $2,850 for a frameset. 

Florida-based bike brand Ventum launched onto the scene in 2015 with an eye-catching frame designed to maximize aero performance in longer-distance, non-drafting races, like 70.3s and 140.6s. The catch: Triathletes had to shell out a minimum of $6,250 just for the statement-making frame—and $8,500 for a build with Ultegra Di2 components.

Well, Ventum ooglers, now’s your chance to become a full-fledged, downtube-eschewing Ventum owner.

The new Ventum Z range cuts more than 50 percent off of that original Ventum One price tag, putting the standalone frameset at $2,850, and a complete build—with a combo of Dura Ace, Ultegra, and other Shimano components—now at $3,500. Previously, the Z was only offered as a complete build for $5,500 (an option that is still available). Other unconventional frame designs from brands like Dimond and TriRig still hover above $3K for framesets ($4,200 and $3,400, respectively), while both brands’ complete builds crest at least $6K.

The move puts Ventum in a highly competitive market. That $3K range is a sweet spot for tri bikes right now, and there’s no shortage of incredible, completely built rigs available around that price. Think: Kestrel’s 5000SL Ultegra ($3,800), Cervélo’s P2 ($2,800), and Scott’s Plasma 10 ($2,900).

It’ll be fun to see how Ventum fares with the new Z models. While Ventum builds decidedly long-course bikes, the Z’s success (or not) will still give the market a sense of how much triathletes want diamond frames; has everyone been holding back because they were second-mortgage pricey? We shall see.

The bottom line: The Z’s got a lot of competition in the $3K price range, but if you’re a long-course athlete itching to get rid of your downtube, this is an exciting development.

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