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How I Qualified For 70.3 Worlds: Marc-Antoine Langlois

Over the next couple of weeks we'll introduce you to a mix of age-group triathletes who all punched their tickets to Vegas.

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Over the next couple of weeks we’ll introduce you to a mix of age-group triathletes who all punched their tickets to Vegas—some in more harrowing circumstances than others. The athletes also give training advice that helped them get to the level they are at today. The 2012 Ironman World Championship 70.3 race will take place on Sept. 9, 2012 in Henderson, Nev. Check back to Triathlete.com for complete coverage from the race.

Marc-Antoine Langlois
Age: 29 (qualified 30–34)
Qualified: 3rd at Mooseman 70.3

By day a software application specialist in Montreal, Langlois PR’d at Mooseman 70.3 in June to earn his second trip to Henderson Vegas after also qualifying last year. This time, however, Langlois is out for revenge: Last year on race morning he was stricken with traveler’s diarrhea, and, though he finished, he says it’s the hardest race he’s ever done.

At Mooseman, Langlois says, “I waited for the rolldown and the first two didn’t take their slot. I didn’t spare a second to get up and claim my spot.”

The native Québécois started out in duathlons in 2004, then took swimming lessons seriously and completed his first triathlon in 2008. Langlois is somewhat coached by his father, who, since Langlois started in the sport, “has read everything he could find on the subject,” and structures his son’s training and race schedule each season.

Tip: Due to Montreal’s severe winters and abbreviated racing season, Langlois works on specific strength training 2–3 days a week in the offseason, having found out this season that it makes a huge difference for him. He also incorporates hiking and skiing to keep his legs moving. But above all, he uses the winter to work on his swim. “Keep things fun, have short-term and long-term objectives to keep motivation up, and set realistic goals,” Langlois says.