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Hit The Books: Three New Endurance Reads

Three new endurance books for a trio of triathlete interests.

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Three new endurance books for a trio of triathlete interests.

For the sports science buff:

Bold ideas about hydration guidelines have earned Tim Noakes, Ph.D., a reputation as a bit of a zealot in the world of exercise physiology. His latest book, Waterlogged (Human Kinetics, $24.95), details why he believes endurance athletes should drink less. It reads like a textbook (don’t expect a page-turner), but if you want to know the hard science behind his beliefs, Waterlogged may change the way you look at aid stations.

RELATED: “The World’s Toughest Endurance Challenges” Features 50 Events

For the speed-seeker:

Our own Inside Triathlon magazine, compiled its most insightful training articles into The Triathlete’s Guide to Peak Performance (Velopress, $5.99). This e-book shares the philosophies of the sport’s most successful coaches and offers guidelines to improve your diet, bike strength, heat resistance, mental toughness and more.

For the pro aficionado:

Craig Alexander’s reserved public persona takes a back seat in his book As the Crow Flies: My Journey to Ironman World Champion (Velopress, $39.95). In Alexander’s own words, the book chronicles his journey to the pinnacle of the sport—winning both the 70.3 and Ironman World Championships in the same year, then achieving a sub-eight-hour finish in 2012—while balancing his training, travel and family life. It also showcases Paul K. Robbins’ beautiful black-and-white photography, which offers a rare glimpse into Alexander’s private life.