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Beginner’s Luck: Don’t Become a Triathlon Monster (Part II)

Presenting two more “hacks” to ensure your family life continues to run well while you are out there chasing your big dream.

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Previously, I wrote Part I about how to start to keep your triathlon monster at bay—and your family and relationships in tact—when you are training for long-course racing. I say long-course racing, but really, these tips apply to triathletes tackling all distances.

To recap last week’s installment:

1. Your Goals are Not Their Goals

2. Your Time Is Not More Important.

Presenting two more “hacks” to ensure your family life continues to run well while you are out there chasing your big dream.

3. Pull Your Weight (And I Don’t Mean on the Climbs)

Each family has their own pre-iron distance household dynamics, and for the most part, you will want to keep that going. I know, it may seem impossible, but hear me out. The goal is to train and have the household continue to chug along as much as possible without too much interruption.

If you did the laundry and dishes before long-course racing, then keep that going. Expecting others to pick up the lion’s share of responsibilities is too much; it wears on the other people. NO matter how nice and wonderful they are—they get tired. Sure, they may agree to it at the beginning, but speaking from experience, it’s best to keep your pre-race roles similarly defined.

Even when you can’t keep your eyes open, keep going. You can do it. Wash those socks!

4. Be Willing to Say “Thank You” and “I’m Sorry”

No matter what, remember to say “thank you” and “I’m sorry.” Be grateful for the help, the extra work and weight those others are pulling. Because, well, they are doing something for you—whether you see it or not. When you are away, someone is doing something—especially if there are kids in the house.

Learn to say “I’m sorry,” because even if you are doing all the things right, you will be crabby, hungry or snappy at some point—have your “I’m sorry” muscles ready to use, and use them often.

“Thank you” and “I’m sorry” are really the antidotes to resentment and bitterness.

Remember your people are “your people.” Triathlon is an amazing sport, but at the end of the day and life, it’s your people who matter.  Treat them well, love them hard and know that your triathlon monster is just below the surface—keep her quiet, kind and well-fed for a happy house.

Meredith Atwood (@SwimBikeMom) is a recovering attorney, motivational speaker and author of Triathlon for the Every Woman. You can download a free copy of the book here. She is the host of the podcast, The Same 24 Hours, a show which interviews interesting people who make the best of the 24 hours in each day. Meredith lives in Atlanta with her husband and two children, and writes about all things at MeredithAtwood.com