These two repair stands are ready to make you a better bike mechanic. Happy bike, happy life.

We look at the pros and cons of two bike repair stands.

Topeak Prepstand Pro

 

bike repair stand
Photo: Corey Hollister

Topeak.com; $330

What:

The PrepStand Pro is the bells-and-whistles counterpart to the workhorse PRS-22.2 from Park Tool. Boasting a non-marking clamp that can either attach to a seatpost or a top tube, this relatively compact stand is portable enough for racing road trips. Aside from solid three-legged construction, the big selling point is an included digital scale for weighing your ride (and with an additional kit sold separately, you can also weigh parts one-by-one).

Pros:

Super-easy telescoping setup and a quick mount to the bike’s seatpost or top tube is definitely a huge benefit—for quick fixes, there’s no excuse for not using this bike repair stand. The ability to swing the bike upward and downward—accessing the bike’s underside and top of the bars—is also a key feature for triathletes with finicky setups.

Cons:

Though at 13.7 pounds it only weighs slightly more than the PRS-22.2, even when folded the PrepStand Pro certainly isn’t practical on flights to races. This bike repair stand also takes up more space when deployed, and users still have to deal with a flopping front wheel unless it’s affixed with an extra accessory or strap. Also, because the bike hangs off the arm, it’s important to get a heavier rig in the right spot on the tripod to avoid tipping.

Park Tool PRS-22.2 Team Issue Repair Stand

bike repair stand
Photo: Corey Hollister

Parktool.com; $340

What:

The PRS-22.2 is a compact repair/cleaning stand in the style preferred by many Pro Tour cycling mechanics. Rather than clamping to the bike’s seatpost (which could be any variety of weird shape, size, and length for tri bikes), either the front or rear wheel is removed, the dropouts are locked to the stand, and the bottom bracket is strapped to a mount in the middle. This bike repair stand still allows for 95 percent of all repairs and 360 degrees of bike access.

Pros:

This setup is strikingly small—the stand folds up into a very compact shape and weighs very little (12.5 pounds), given its sturdiness. This is something that a triathlete could conceivably fly with and easily use in the tight confines of a hotel room. Without a support attaching to the seatpost, a home mechanic can spin the whole bike around easily on the stand’s axis to access most everything. The dropout lock also works well on all setups from quick release to thru axles.

Cons:

Though removing a wheel is slightly annoying, the biggest downside is the inability to access the bottom of the bike. While this isn’t a big deal for the vast majority of repairs, if you’re routing cables, for example, this could be an issue. Also, be sure you don’t have some extremely unusual under bottom bracket shape that could hinder mounting (though the PRS-22.2’s bottom bracket mount is actually quite adaptable).

The Winning Bike Repair Stand

Park Tool PRS-22.2 Team Issue Repair Stand

Though pro bike builders may find a few limitations, this unconventional but rock-solid setup is ideal for nomadic triathletes with a zest for DIY work.