There are more options than ever when it comes to making sure you stay hydrated.

There’s no way around it. On runs lasting more than an hour, you’re going to need to drink up. Though some runners stay hydrated by plotting a route with public water fountains along the way (or stashing bottles in the bushes along the route), most opt to stow their agua on their person during a run. The simplest and cheapest way to do so is by simply holding a water bottle in one hand, but sweat and large bottles can make it hard to get a good grip, distracting you from more important things like form and pace. Luckily, multiple options exist for runners to carry hydration in practical and convenient ways.

Handheld Bottle

Nathan SpeedShot Plus Insulated Water Bottle
Backcountry.com, $30

For shorter runs, a handheld bottle can do the trick. Rather than a round one that is tough to grip, many athlete handhelds are molded to fit the curve of the hand. A strap keeps the bottle secure, while an optional pocket allows a small spot to stash a car key or a gel.

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Handheld Soft Flask

Osprey Duro Hand
Rei.com, $30

Instead of a molded plastic bottle, the handheld soft flask uses a flexible polyurethane to contain fluids. As the runner sips from the bottle, the polyurethane compresses. Like its hard-molded cousin, this option comes with a strap to secure the flask to the hand as well as a small pocket.

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Waist Belt

Fitletic Hydra 12 Hydration Belt
Amazon.com, $26.95

Waist belts come equipped with holsters to carry bottles. Some are located on the lower back to carry a single, larger bottle, while others hold multiple smaller bottles (often the same ones used in handheld hydration setups) around the waist.

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Backpack

Cotopaxi Veloz 3L Hydration Pack
Cotopaxi.com, $119.95

For very long runs, especially those without easy access to water sources, a hydration backpack is an excellent option. These packs come equipped with a water bladder made of flexible polyurethane that can carry one to three liters of water.

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Vest

Camelbak Nano Vest
Backcountry.com, $100

Like a backpack, a hydration vest allows a runner to carry more water than a handheld. However, a vest is more likely to carry the weight on the front of the body, in soft flasks held on the chest (though some vests use a water bladder on the back, like a backpack).

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