Lacking strength in the pool? Skip the weight room, and go straight to the pull buoy.

Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 mins (or less!)

This week’s workout comes from Michael Gallagher, head coach of Rogue Tri Performance in southern Oregon. Gallagher is an Ironman competitor and is USAT, USMS (Level 2), ASCA (Level 2) and ACE (personal trainer and sports conditioning) certified.

Lacking strength in the pool? Skip the weight room, and go straight to the pull buoy. Especially in rough open water swims, having swim-specific strength can make a choppy, soul-sucking first leg into a day when you beat your competition out of the water for the first time. While technique is always king, having extra power can help when form fails.

This week’s workout is key because it builds speed and allows swimmers to build strength at the same time. After a strong pulling set like this, you should be able to really “feel” your swim muscles activating. The speed sections of this set allow you to push yourself and feel what your muscles are doing, giving that all-important swimming muscle awareness.

“In a long swim event (70.3 or Ironman) your muscles will feel fatigued, just as the pulling sets do to your muscles,” says Gallagher. “So by adding speed into the workout, it will help you build confidence when needing to pass someone on the swim while keeping your swim form.”

Warm-up
2 x (200 swim/50 single arm drill)
2 x (200 pull/50 kick with or without board)

Main Set
300 pull (easy/med/fast by 100) with 30 seconds rest
2 x 50 at race pace
300 pull (build each 100) with 30 seconds rest
4 x 50 at race pace
300 swim (50 non-free/100 free) with 30 seconds rest
6 x 50 at race pace
300 swim recovery
8 x 25 (odd: race pace / even: steady pace)

50 intervals should be the same time as your 100m race pace (ie: 1:30 per 100 average for 70.3, then 2 x 50 @1:30)

Cool-down
200 swim

Total: 3000

More one-hour workouts