Triathlete.com http://www.triathlete.com The latest triathlon gear, training, nutrition, photos, races, movers, shakers, and more Tue, 23 May 2017 21:19:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 http://www.triathlete.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/apple-touch-icon-180x180-120x120.png Triathlete.com http://www.triathlete.com 32 32 Photos: Athletes Take On Tough Ironman Lanzarote Course http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/photos/photos-ironman-lanzarote_302014 Tue, 23 May 2017 21:07:07 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=302014 Ironman Lanzarote is known as one of the toughest courses that covers the distance.

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Ironman Lanzarote, one of the longest-standing Ironmans in Europe, is known as one of the toughest courses that covers the distance. On Saturday, 1,600 athletes took on the brutally hot course for bragging rights and a shot at one of 40 qualifying slots to the 2017 Ironman World Championship. First competitors took to the two-lap swim course at Playa Grande, Puerto del Carmen. Then it was onto the toughest part of the day—the bike course. It’s well known for strong winds and leads athletes around the island with over 2,551 meters of climbing. Finally, the two-lap run course led competitors along the flat sea front of Puerto del Carmen, toward the airport and back.

See the pro gallery here

Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

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4 Guilt-Free Pizza Recipes http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/nutrition/4-guilt-free-pizza-recipes_302007 Tue, 23 May 2017 16:23:31 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=302007 These four recipes elevate America’s favorite food to a workout-sustaining staple.

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Photo: Oliver Baker

It’s no pie-in-the-sky notion—pizza can be excellent, guilt-free fuel. You just have to make it right. These four recipes elevate America’s favorite food to a workout-sustaining staple that’ll tickle your taste buds. 

Quick Dough Recipe

Making fresh pizza dough is a cinch with this foolproof recipe. In a medium bowl, whisk 1 envelope rapid/quick-rise yeast, 1 teaspoon sugar and 1 cup warm water until dissolved. Let it sit 5–10 minutes, until it turns creamy. Stir in 2½ cups all-purpose or white whole-wheat flour, ¾ teaspoon salt and 2 tablespoons olive oil until smooth. Let it rest 5 minutes. Lightly flour a clean surface, turn dough onto it and roll into a round. Gently shape dough onto a lightly greased pizza sheet or pizza stone (recommended), dusted with cornmeal. All recipes will be baked at 450 degrees. Alternatively, many grocery stores have pre-made pizza dough in the refrigerated section.

Gorgonzola, Pear & Prosciutto pizza

Sweet, salty and with just enough edge from the gorgonzola cheese, this is not your ordinary pie.

Ingredients:
1 small yellow onion, thinly sliced
1 T olive oil
½ tsp, each, salt and pepper
¾ cup shredded Gouda cheese
¼ cup crumbled gorgonzola cheese
1 Bosch pear, thinly sliced
4 pieces prosciutto, sliced
2 T fresh chives, chopped
Pizza dough

Directions:
In a skillet, sauté the onion, olive oil, salt and pepper until caramelized, about 10 minutes. Sprinkle the cheeses across the pizza dough. Spread the onions over the cheese. Layer the pear and prosciutto slices over the onion. Bake for about 15 minutes until cheese is bubbling, and toppings and crust are golden. Sprinkle fresh chives over the top before serving.

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One-Hour Workout: Breathing Pattern And Pull Work http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/training/one-hour-workout-breathing-pattern-and-pull-work_115124 Tue, 23 May 2017 16:20:55 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=115124 This workout has a two-part focus: working on your breathing pattern and your distance per stroke.

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 minutes (or less!).

This week’s swim workout comes from John Murray, a USAT Level II-certified coach and co-founder of Team Multisport Performance Institute (TeamMPI.com). This workout has a two-part focus: working on your breathing pattern and your distance per stroke. “Turning your head to breathe has the potential to make your legs sink and disrupt your rhythm,” Murray says. “For this workout, focus on keeping the head aligned with the spine for smooth and effortless breathing.”

RELATED – Ask Coach Sara: What Is A Normal Breathing Pattern?

One-Hour Workout: Breathing Pattern and Pull Work

For the breathing pattern swims, swim four lengths, switching breathing pattern from one breath every two strokes the first length, to one breath every three strokes, then to every four and finally every five. Focus on exhaling briskly underwater, keeping your arms moving continuously and keeping your head aligned with your spine.

Let’s begin to count arm strokes with this workout. A swimmer with low drag and great hold on the water is efficient and covers more ground with each stroke. We call this maximum distance per stroke (or Max DPS). As you swim these sets, begin to get an idea of how much distance you can cover with each stroke or note how low your count can get.

Warm-up
400 easy warm-up mix or about 10 minutes of easy swimming. You can include drills, kicking, etc., as long as it is EASY.

Main Set
Take 1–2 minutes between each set
300 easy kicking w/ fins (on your back or front, with or without a kickboard)
4×100 easy (breathe every 2, 3, 4, 5), rest 15–20 seconds between each 100
8×25 swim (Max DPS), rest 10 seconds between each 25
4×100 easy (breathe every 2, 3, 4, 5), rest 15–20 seconds between each 100
8×25 swim (Max DPS), rest 10 seconds between each 25

Cool-down
200 easy recovery

Total yardage = 2100

RELATED – One-Hour Workout: Simple Swim Drills Plus Pacing

More one-hour workouts.

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Photos: 2017 XTERRA Oak Mountain Championship http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/photos/photos-2017-xterra-oak-mountain-championship_301971 Mon, 22 May 2017 21:41:53 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301971 More than 350 triathletes from 12 countries and 42 U.S. states traveled to Shelby County, Ala. for the 12th annual XTERRA Oak Mountain Championship race.

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More than 350 triathletes from 12 countries and 42 U.S. states traveled to Shelby County, Ala. for the 12th annual XTERRA Oak Mountain Championship race on Saturday, May 20. It was the fifth of 10 events on the XTERRA Pan America Tour and the first of three majors on the XTERRA America Tour, and the field was stacked with the best-of-the-best off-roaders. The race combined a one-mile swim in the 77 degree waters of Double Oak Lake with 20 miles of perfect single-track mountain biking and six miles of twisting, rolling, tree-lined trail running. Josiah Middaugh and Suzie Snyder took the elite titles, while Humberto Rivera and Deanna McCurdy won the amateur crowns.

Photos provided by XTERRA.

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Beginner’s Luck: 5 Essential Tips for Newbies http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/lifestyle/beginners-luck-5-essential-tips-newbies_301998 Mon, 22 May 2017 21:00:55 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301998 A reminder: We were all beginners at one point in our triathlon journeys.

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A reminder: We were all beginners at one point in our triathlon journeys.

I think some triathletes forget that they were ever beginners. I can be on a race course and experience such bad behavior sometimes that I have to stop and think: “Did that guy ever have a first race?” I mean, the impatience, intolerance and attitude of “get out of my way” is so crazy, so inhuman sometimes. All triathletes, at some point, were beginners—a fact that is often lost on seasoned athletes. True, some of us are much faster, much more talented than other races from the outset. But the reality? We were all, once upon a time, beginners.

“Newbie Right Here!” Sometimes newbies need to have a sign on their back. Most of the time newbies don’t need a sign, though. We all know who the newbies are. BUT, here’s the thing. Again—we were ALL newbies at one point. As a newbie triathlete, the first step in getting to triathlon is embracing that you will do stupid things and don’t worry about how you look. You might wear your helmet backwards (get that straight, ASAP, though!) You will swim in the wrong direction. You will feel naked the first time your run in that tri suit. You will fall off your bike at intersections, trying to unwind yourself from your clipless pedals. Then you will fall off your bike approximately sixteen thousand more times. Embrace the embarrassing moments. You will get better. Don’t give up. Just accept that everyone else knows you are new, and remind them, if it gets hairy—that they too were new once.

Study Triathlon. Like it’s your job. Okay, not really. BUT learn the rules and the etiquette of the three sports. You will still make dumb moves and do embarrassing things, but you can certainly semi-save yourself with some reading, some dedication and some research. Take advantage of the endless triathlon resources in books, magazines and online media. Before your race, absorb the race packet, read every single word the race director sends you, and follow the rules on race day. Be prepared mentally, and it will translate to fewer embarrassing (not to mention, dangerous) mistakes.

Swim. Bike. Run. Repeat. You must do these things, and semi-often. Then you must put them together in a row in a race—that’s called triathlon. If you only swim twice a year, bike never and run occasionally, you are asking for the race to be a series of embarrassing moments. You will fall down on the race course and you might stay there. Swim, bike and run often—you will thank yourself on race day—and enjoy the process much more.

Be a Mental Giant. Be aware that, as a beginner, you will get your feelings hurt. Someone will inevitably make a comment that stings. For me, it was someone inadvertently stating, “Oh em gee, I am so slow!” Then I saw they crushed my race time by hours. Remember to keep a strong heart and an even stronger determination. You have no reason to be embarrassed when you are putting forth your best effort.

Enjoy the Process. One day you will look back and laugh at your newbie chronicles. Yes, you really will. Don’t forget in your quest to whatever triathlon things you dream, to take a breath and appreciate the journey.

Meredith Atwood (@SwimBikeMom) is a recovering attorney, motivational speaker and author of Triathlon for the Every Woman. She is the host of the new podcast, “The Same 24 Hours,” a show which interviews interesting people who make the best of the 24 hours in each day. Meredith and Deb Cheslow have a new online series called “Your Brave Mind,” that is turning heads and changing lives. She lives in Atlanta with her husband and two children, and writes about all things at MeredithAtwood.com.

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Strengthen Your Stride to Keep Injury at Bay http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/training/strengthen-stride-keep-injury-bay_301908 Mon, 22 May 2017 17:02:20 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301908 These three workouts will fortify your legs for the race season to come.

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Sturdy legs keep injury away. A simple plan to do it right. 

Setting a foundation of strength work during the spring ensures that when it comes time for summer speed, your legs will be able to withstand whatever abuse you dish out. These three workouts will fortify your legs for the race season to come.

The basics

Do three sets of these simple exercises at least three times per week after any run or cycling session to strengthen often overlooked muscles that can cause injury in unusual places later down the line.

20 squats: Thrust your butt back as you go down, almost to the point where you’re falling backward. Don’t let your knees go in front of your toes. After these become easy, graduate to one-legged squats while resting the top of your other foot on a raised surface behind you. Do 20 on each side. Later, add dumbbells or a medicine ball.
Strengthens: Hamstrings and glutes, but also calves, abs and lower back

15 calf raises: This exercise can prevent season-ending Achilles injuries, calf troubles and shin splints, so don’t rush it. Same drill as squats: Do both calves at the same time to start, then graduate to 15 on each side. Do these on a step and be sure your heel goes as low as possible, then as high as possible very slowly. A good rule of thumb is two seconds up, two seconds hold at the top, two seconds down.
Strengthens: Calves and soleus muscles

Lunge matrix, 10 per leg in each direction: Lunge one leg forward, keeping your front knee directly above your toes; lunge to the side, keeping the non-lunging leg straight and the lunging leg’s knee above the toe; lunge backward, stepping one leg behind, the other leg remaining in front, knee above the toe. Do this 10 times on each leg.
Strengthens: Most major leg muscles; back and abdominal muscles

Build runs

After you’ve laid down an aerobic base, the next step is to add build runs. Build runs are important for increasing strength by working hard on already tired muscles. Keep in mind that during this phase in your training you don’t need to approach race pace yet, so don’t go overboard on the fast part. The easiest way to approach a build run is to use time and perceived effort or heart rate rather than distance and speed—save that stuff for later.

The big build: 15-minute warm-up easy; 10 minutes at 5 out of 10 effort, 10 minutes at 6/10, 10 minutes at 7/10; 10-minute cool-down easy

The broken build: 15-minute warm-up easy; 5 minutes at 5/10 effort, 5 minutes at 6/10, 5 minutes at 7/10, 3 minutes easy; 5 minutes at 6/10, 5 minutes at 7/10, 5 minutes at 8/10; 10-minute cool-down easy

Hills

Once you’ve been training and doing the strength building exercises for a few weeks, it’s time to add some hills to the mix. Hill training not only builds strength for running, but also allows you to focus on your form and even adds power on the bike. During the pre-season, it’s not necessary to do short, steep, intense hill reps—those will come later. Instead, focus on long, gradual sustained hill climbs for big strength gains without the risk of injury. Add a big hill near the end of your long run to build power on already tired legs, focusing first on running tall, then leaning forward and looking at the ground in front of you. Do not look up at the top of the hill, which can cause you to tip back and rotate your stride back onto your heels. Build throughout each hill, splitting it up into thirds: the first third finding your perfect form, the second third slightly increasing your turnover and speed, the final third cresting the top with power while still retaining form.

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Monday Minute: Increase Hip Flexor Strength http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/training/monday-minute-wall-soas-hold_6064 Mon, 22 May 2017 09:00:17 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/11/videos/monday-minute-wall-soas-hold_6940 By strengthening the deep hip flexor muscle known as the psoas, you can increase stride length and reduce injury!

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This edition of Monday Minute introduces an exercise that will help to increase hip flexor strength. By strengthening the deep hip flexor muscle known as the psoas, you can increase stride length and reduce injury!

More “Monday Minute” videos

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Photos: Aernouts, Charles Conquer Tough Lanzarote Course http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/ironman/photos-aernouts-charles-conquer-tough-lanzarote-course_301871 Sun, 21 May 2017 14:08:06 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301871 Belgium's Bart Aernouts and Great Britain's Lucy Charles were impressive across swim, bike and run.

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Photos: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image/@Compimagephoto

The tough Ironman Lanzarote course is known for its gusty winds, but thankfully for the athletes Saturday was calmer than usual. Despite the calmer winds, warmer temperatures still made for a tough day. A total of 1,600 athletes started the race at 7 a.m. in Puerto del Carmen for the 26th edition of Club La Santa Ironman Lanzarote.

In the end, Belgium’s Bart Aernouts earned the victory in 8:34:13 with Italy’s Alessandro Degasperi and the United States’ Jesse Thomas claiming the other podium spots.

On the women’s side, Great Britain’s Lucy Charles was impressive across swim, bike and run—taking the victory in 9:35:40. Australia’s Corinne Abraham and Great Britain’s Lucy Gossage finished second and third, respectively.

2017 Ironman Lanzarote
Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain – May 20, 2017
2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile run

Men
1. Bart Aernouts (BEL) 8:34:13
2. Alessandro Degasperi (ITA) 8:43:23
3. Jesse Thomas (USA) 8:49:02
4. Peru Alfaro (PER) 8:52:31
5. Romain Guillaume (FRA) 8:57:01

Women
1. Lucy Charles (GBR) 9:35:40
2. Corinne Abraham (GBR) 9:44:29
3. Lucy Gossage (GBR) 9:50:22
4. Jeanne Collonge (FRA) 10:04:46
5. Saleta Castro Nogueira (ESP) 10:11:45

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Sarah True on Moving up—Sort Of http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/lifestyle/culture/sarah-true-moving-sort_301860 Fri, 19 May 2017 22:48:36 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301860 It’s been eight years since American Sarah True (née Groff) has dipped her toes in Ironman 70.3 racing, but the two-time Olympian will return to long-course at Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga this Sunday.

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It’s been eight years since American Sarah True (née Groff) has dipped her toes in Ironman 70.3 racing, but the two-time Olympian will return to long-course at Ironman 70.3 Chattanooga this Sunday. True previously competed at Ironman 70.3 Oceanside and the 70.3 World Championship in 2009, but has been focusing solely on ITU racing since then. We caught up with True just a few days before her re-introduction to long-course racing.

Triathlete.com: Are you focused on Ironman 70.3 for this season, or will we still see you at some ITU events?

True: I’m pretty much going to do the rest of the ITU [WTS] season and then I’ll transition over to non-drafting after that. This is just to get my feet wet, because I haven’t done a half-Ironman since 2009. This will be a good little gauge for the second part of the season—September, October and November. I have an idea of what I need to be working on, but this will be a good litmus test for me. [Ironman 70.3] racing has changed since I last raced—and I’ve changed since then—so this is a way to see where I fit in.

Triathlete.com: Did you choose Chattanooga because 70.3 Worlds will be there in September?

True: Not really. Originally I was hoping to do a half a few weeks ago, but I crashed about five weeks ago and coming back from that took a little longer than I would’ve liked. So this one just fit into the schedule well and it’s fairly easy travel from New Hampshire.

Triathlete.com: Did you take some downtime after Rio and have you made any significant changes to your training since then?

True: I realized about two months ago that my bike wasn’t where it needed to be, so I’ve been playing a little bit of catch-up. I’ve been focusing a lot more on the bike because you have to at this distance. Right now I’m writing my own training program, but I have a couple of people advising me on what to do. Really nothing has changed too much from what I was doing before—I’m just spending a lot more time on my TT bike.

Triathlete.com: So is Ironman 70.3 Worlds in September on your radar?

True: It all depends on whether or not I feel I can be competitive. I don’t want to go unless I feel I’m ready to race at the front for a 70.3.

Triathlete.com: Have you given any thought into going even longer in the future? 

True: There’s a part of me that definitely wants to do an Ironman. Maybe it’ll happen sometime next year. It’s a bucket-list thing for so many of us. I just have to decide whether I’m just going to be an Ironman fan or if it’s something I can actually race well in. I wouldn’t want to do it as a pro just to finish. I’m competitive. I only want to do it if I can do a good job. So we’ll see.

Triathlete.com: People always say that finishing fourth at the Olympics is one of the toughest things that can happen to an athlete. But was it even tougher not to be able to finish in Rio versus finishing fourth in London?

True: Oh man. Those were tough in very different ways. In Rio it was kind of a freak thing—almost like getting a flat. It was hard to process. In 2012 it was tough because there was the thought of “what could I have done differently in training to be just a little faster?” That leads you down a very different path of thinking than something like not finishing. 2012 was bittersweet. 2016 was devastating in a very different way. I’m lucky I had the experience to be able to process it in a healthy way.

 

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One Year Later, Triathlete Shark Attack Victim Is Back in the Water http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/lifestyle/one-year-later-triathlete-shark-attack-victim-back-water_301836 Fri, 19 May 2017 17:55:49 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301836 Maria Korcsmaros credits her triathlon fitness for a miraculously speedy recovery—and her tri teammates for helping with her incredible mental resilience.

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Maria Korcsmaros credits her triathlon fitness for a miraculously speedy recovery—and her tri teammates for helping with her incredible mental resilience.

It was Memorial Day 2016 and Maria Korcsmaros had missed her early morning group swim. Like any triathlete, the 20-year veteran of the sport wasn’t deterred—instead, she turned a mid-afternoon family outing at the Corona Del Mar State Beach into a training session.

“I jumped in the water at about 4:15 p.m. to do my laps at the buoy line [about 200m from shore],” Korcsmaros recalls. Korcsmaros had swam at that same beach with her training group, TriLaVie, almost every week during the warm season since moving to Southern California in 2008; she knew the area well.

“So I jump in the water, but since it’s Memorial Day Weekend, I’m by myself, but I’m feeling OK because there are a bunch of people on the beach, and there are usually people coming out there and swimming on their own anyway,” says Korcsmaros.

“As I rounded buoy number three, and on my way back to buoy number two, I got hit by something that hit my whole torso,” she recalls. “It was very piercing, very painful. I thought to myself, ‘There’s nothing else in the ocean that’s that big, except for a shark.’ I thought, ‘Holy shit, I just got bit by a shark!’”

Even recently, California has been a hotbed of shark activity, like the recent attack on a single mother of three who was bitten off of San Onofre State Beach in early May, or the multiple sightings near San Juan Capistrano. Both incidents occurred in Orange County, the same county as Korcsmaros’ bite. Experts cite several reasons for more shark activity in the area, including a rebound in white shark and marine mammal populations due to their protected status.

Though Korcsmaros had an inkling, what she didn’t realize was that she had just been bitten by what experts are saying was a roughly 10-foot great white shark. It’s an exceedingly rare occurrence—in 2016 only 53 people were attacked by any type of shark in the U.S., according to the University of Florida’s International Shark Attack File. Thirty-two of those attacks happened in Florida. California only had four.

Thanks to the lucid, quick thinking of both Korcsmaros and lifeguards, a lifeguard boat had her out of the water in less than a minute. (Even a year later, Korcsmaros still affectionately calls them “my lifeguards” when she brings them up in conversation.) Furthermore, the paramedics’ quick response had her from attack to operating table in less than an hour.

The laundry list of damage was extensive: Three broken ribs, a fractured pelvis, a tricep detached to the bone (later reattached), a severed femoral nerve (her right leg is still numb from her quad to her glute) and a severed femoral artery that caused her to lose two pints of blood. Korcsmaros also suffered a punctured lung when her ribs were broken; the shark even bit through her liver and took a piece of it with him.

And yet after being in the ICU for three days, she was released from the hospital in less than two weeks. Korcsmaros was walking only seven days after surgery.

Though her plans to race Muskoka 70.3 that July obviously had to be scrapped, Korcsmaros blazed through her recovery to get back on the roads. Despite not being able to move her right arm for two months, she was able to do a small amount of swimming in mid-July. “Once I got the swim going, I thought, ‘You know, when I get home, I’m going to be starting physical therapy for the arm […] maybe I should get back to Esprit de She [in October],” she says. Korcsmaros was back riding a mountain bike on the roads by September.

Amazingly, Korcsmaros was able to compete with her TriLaVie teammates at Esprit de She in October. “That was very positive, and that got me going again. I got a lot of motivation by doing that race,” she says.

When Korcsmaros reflects on the experience as a whole, she’s far more matter-of-fact than you’d think.

“I think health is very important, and when you’re strong going into something like this—whether it be a shark attack, a car accident, cancer, any illness—if you’re stronger going in, you’re going to be stronger going out,” she says. “If I wasn’t strong and healthy, it would have been a lot different for me. Having a positive attitude, having that stubbornness and willingness to put time into yourself.”

Her next big goal is an Ironman—something she was hoping to do in her 20th year of the sport, but was clearly derailed by the attack. When it comes to open water swimming in the ocean, she’s already back at it. Already this year, Korcsmaros has been swimming in an area less than a half-mile from last year’s attack, named Pirate’s Cove. “It’s very shallow, very clear,” she says of her new spot. “There are a lot of stingrays, but the chances of a shark are very minimal.”

To be certain, the attack has left a small psychic mark. “All three times I was [at Pirate’s Cove], I had a little bit of anxiety,” she says of her early-season open water swims. “Just weird stuff that you wouldn’t think would bother you, and it does.” Korcsmaros is hoping to tackle her first ocean event since the attack at the Santa Barbara Tri in late August, but has been a little deterred due to the recent shark sightings in Southern California. “If I want to do Santa Barbara, I have to get my head around getting back in,” Korcsmaros says, as if it was simply a matter of falling off of a bike and getting back on.

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Quick Set Friday: Down & Outs http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/training/quick-set-friday-outs_96969 Fri, 19 May 2017 16:05:08 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=96969 A new and creative workout from coach Sara McLarty.

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Triathlete contributor and swimming all-star Sara McLarty has a blog with more than 500 creative workouts used in her Masters swim program in Clermont, Fla. We’ll feature a workout every Friday so you have new ideas to take to the pool. On her blog (Mastersswimworkoutsbysaramclarty.blogspot.com), you can pick a Monday set for a long distance focus, a Wednesday set for sprint training, or Friday for creative open water skills.

A:
300 swim/200 pull/100 kick
6×125 @ 2:15 (50 kick/75 build)
2×250 @ 3:40 (200 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
2×200 @ 3:00 (150 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
2×150 @ 2:20 (100 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
2×100 @ 1:40 (50 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
2×50 @ :60 (25 FAST/25 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
4x[4×25 Down & Outs
100 easy/recovery swim w/ :30 rest]
200 cool-down
*4300 total*

RELATEDSwim Speed Series: Keep Your Head Down

B:
300 swim/200 pull/100 kick
4×125 @ 3:00 (50 kick/75 build)
2×200 @ 4:15 (150 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/:30 rest
2×150 @ 3:15 (100 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
2×100 @ 2:15 (50 FAST/50 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
2×50 @ 1:15 (25 FAST/25 easy)
100 kick w/ :30 rest
4x[4×25 Down & Outs
100 easy/recovery swim w/:60 rest]
200 cool-down
*3500 total*

RELATED: 20×50 Drills Swim Workout For Triathletes

C:
300 swim/200 pull/100 kick
4×100 w/ :30 rest (50 kick/50 build)
2×150 w/ :30 rest (100 FAST/50 easy)
50 Kick w/ :30 rest
2×100 w/ :30 rest (50 FAST/50 easy)
50 Kick w/ :30 rest
2×50 w/:30 rest (25 FAST/25 easy)
50 kick w/ :30 rest
3x[4×25 Down & Outs
100 easy/recovery swim w/ :60 rest]
150 cool-down
*2500 total*

Down & Outs:
This set has two parts. The first will be a set number of 25s. This part should always be performed FAST!! When you reach the other side of the pool, quickly climb out of the water, wait 5 seconds, dive back in the pool and sprint to the other side. Repeat the climbing out and 5 second rest until you have completed the given number, for example: 4×25 Down & Outs.
The second part is the rest and recovery. Usually, if the number of D&Os equals 100 yards, the recovery will be 100 yards. After the recovery swim, rest an extra :30-:60 seconds before repeating the set.

More swim workouts for triathletes

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The Triathlete’s Guide to Social Media Stardom http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/lifestyle/triathletes-ultimate-guide-social-media_301758 Fri, 19 May 2017 13:01:24 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301758 Presenting the athletes taking charge of triathlon’s image and their insider tips on becoming the next big multisport sensation. 

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Being Internet famous has some serious perks. Yes, you’ll bask in the love of your admirers and score freebies—and cash—from companies who crave your influence. But most importantly, you’ll help grow the sport we love. Presenting the athletes taking charge of triathlon’s image and their insider tips on becoming the next big multisport sensation. 

First, pick your platform. There are scores of online quizzes that’ll help you do this, but we’ll save you the time with this brief rundown so you can spend it training.

You are: Stylish, artsy and love a meticulously staged shot.
Your match: Instagram

You are: Creative, funny and love a great viral video like Chewbacca Mom.
Your match: YouTube

You are: Smart, witty and love a well-placed word.
Your match: Twitter

You are: Positive, community-oriented and love to share.
Your match: Facebook


Photo: Instagram.com/linseycorbin

Instagram

First up: everyone’s favorite life-filtering app. Launched in 2010 by a pair of Stanford grads, Insta now hosts more than 500 million snap-happy users. Advertisers love it because Insta followers are tougher to come by than on other social platforms; without an easy way to re-gram a post into a viral sensation, your best bet for amassing a following is simply to post stuff people happen upon and love. That makes your followers authentic—and more attuned to what you’re posting. Once you get more than 10,000 followers, like your guide Linsey Corbin, you can start making some dough on sponsored posts to the tune of a C-note or two. More than 100,000, like megastar triathlete Jan Frodeno (133,000), and you’re venturing into a solid G per post, a fact that has spurred an entire industry dedicated to pimping Insta accounts. Expect to pay your agent 30 percent of your ad revenue.

Your guide: Linsey Corbin (@linseycorbin)

Her squad: 26,000+ followers

The scene: Most athletes post shots of themselves training, new gear and horrible/awesome weather. Linsey Corbin’s Instagram has all of the above, but she does it better than most.

Why Insta: “It’s a creative medium to share my story,” says Corbin who also uses the service as a traveler’s toolbox. “I like seeking out advice on where to eat, what to see and what to do. I have also used it as motivation to get my butt out the door when I’m in a training funk.”

Tips for Insta-newbies: Corbin advises ’gram game newcomers to have fun, and not be afraid. “Post the good, the bad, the ugly,” she says. “Be authentic. Post often. Follow your favorites. Don’t get caught up in comparing yourself to others. March to the beat of your own drum.” Corbin also recommends following lots of other users, “like” photos, use hashtags and don’t post spam or ads. “Social is supposed to be social, so have conversations,” she says.

Grow your flock: Corbin says her most well-liked posts usually involve her riding fast, inspirational training or racing shots and photos of her golden retriever, Chimmy. Any seasoned Instagrammer will tell you cute puppy pics are bound to get all the likes. “I think people like my posts as they give an inside look into my life outside of swim, bike and run,” says Corbin. “Although there is a lot of that involved as well!”

Favorite personal posts: Though Corbin has so many favorites, she says she loves looking back at her posts over the last five years to see where the sport has taken her. “Some of my favorite things to document on Instagram are seeing places for the first time,” she says.

Favorite follows: Corbin loves following users that inspire her, are themselves and make her laugh: @cabinfolk @corbinbrands @smittenkitchen @campingwithdogs. And of course her sponsors: @trekbikes @clifbar @saucony.


Youtube.com/elager335

YouTube

YouTube is almost like its own Internet. Founded in 2005, the video hosting service has the second highest amount of web traffic of any site in the world, behind Google. According to YouTube, the site has more than a billion users who upload 300 hours of video per minute. Success on the platform is complicated. The Tube is all about views, so storytelling chops and production value help. (Running Google ads can bring in a couple bucks per 1,000 eyeballs.) But true YT success is all about parlaying your on-screen persona into sponsorships, speaking engagements, book deals and other opportunities. With excellent production quality and consistency, no one in the triathlon world is working YouTube quite like short-course pro Eric Lagerstrom

Your guide: Eric Lagerstrom (elager335)

His squad: 600+ subscribers

Most viewed video:Viking Life … The Adventure Van,” 13,647 views

Why YouTube: Lagerstrom is drawn to the video format for the personal connection it gives people to what’s presented on screen. “It uses so many elements to communicate emotion—visuals, sound, music, story,” he says. “It’s an incredible feeling when someone says, ‘That made me feel _____!’ and it was exactly what I was going for.”

Tips for YouTube noobs: Lagerstrom suggests that aspiring online Spielbergs need good content over technical trickery because it can be hard to get viewers’ attention. “Focus on story, not equipment, and consider why someone you don’t know would watch what you’re making,” he says. “Bring some value.” When it comes to cameras, Lagerstrom recommends keeping it simple. “First piece of equipment I’d get is a GoPro,” he says. “You can film triathlon action with it and also film yourself talking, as the microphone isn’t too bad. That wide-angle lens is also very forgiving when trying to keep your subject in frame.”

Grow your flock: Lagerstrom warns against hidden agendas and emphasizes being yourself. “If you’re just throwing out videos pumping your sponsors and not being you, everyone can tell, and they won’t care,” he says. “Be consistent, be authentic, interact.” One of Lagerstrom’s most popular videos is also one of his most painful. “The more raw the emotion, and the less I hold back, the better,” he says. “Like my video about missing the Olympic team—the sadness, emptiness, finding direction.”

Favorite video he’s made: Lagerstrom has a soft spot for his “Alcatraz Victory Lap” video. “It was after I won Escape From Alcatraz Triathlon in 2015, and I went home to Portland to visit my family and my sponsor, Athletes Lounge.

Favorite online video channels: Lagerstrom’s love of video doesn’t end with his posts; his favorite users are behind-the-scenes YouTube channels for video production: “filmriot,” “devingraham” (behind the scenes for “devinsupertramp”) and of course “redbull.”


Twitter

Twitter’s been in the social media game since 2006. Users can post links, pictures and text, but must keep things pithy to meet a 140-character limit. Boasting more than 300 million monthly active users, Twitter is a succinct way to communicate with followers and, just like with Instagram, if you have a ton of them you can score big time; Kim Kardashian (yeah we can’t believe we mentioned her name in Triathlete either) has made as much as $10,000 for a single tweet. On the non-celebrity side, having a shtick—like rating dogs (@dog_rates) or pointing out very British problems
(@SoVeryBritish)—is one solid way to work up a following. Pro Tommy Zaferes is triathlon’s king of the punny one-liner.

Your guide: Tommy Zaferes (@tzaferes)

His squad: 4,000+ followers

Why Twitter: “First, for the quick and easy access to information and updates it provides. With a 140-character limit, you have to get straight to the point,” says Zaferes. “Also, I really like words, and the challenge of painting a picture or portraying an idea with a finite amount of characters is like a fun puzzle.”

Tips for Tweeters-in-training: Zaferes suggests casting a wide net and doing your homework. “Follow a diverse group of accounts: celebrities, media accounts of your favorite hobbies, comedians, friends, politicians, etc.,” he says. “Read the interactions to help learn both what to post, and what not to post.”

Find your following: Due to the flood of posts on Twitter, Zaferes keeps his advice blunt: “You have to create something that few others are doing, and excel at it, so people will follow, share and interact,” he explains. “Don’t post nonsense that everyone and their mother is posting, like what you eat, what your workouts are, excuses as to why workouts or races went poorly or bragging about sessions.” While Zaferes’ Twitter M.O. is writing quick jokes and puns, he says his most liked/retweeted posts are usually pictures he’s taken with funny captions or those that involve wacky tales from his daily life, like this one of Mario Mola at the Island House Triathlon.

Favorite personal posts:
“In triathlon, first you swim, then you bike, then you run out of money.”

“To please the hill rep gods, you must sacrifice two calves.”

“2000lbs of Chinese dumplings is equivalent to wonton.”

Favorite Tweeter: “I follow many ‘Twitter comedians,’ but Steven Skinner (@SkinnerSteven) is definitely my favorite,” says Zaferes. “He specializes in puns as well, and every tweet impresses me.”


Facebook

Facebook pretty much invented social media when it began in 2004, rolling out tools like groups that foster a sense of community no other platform can match. Merging most other social media services into one place, Facebook lets users distribute video, photos, text and in April 2016, it added perhaps its most exciting feature: live video. Combine all of those methods of showcasing yourself with more than 1.8 billion monthly active users, and you have the perfect platform for connecting with a huge, engaged audience. So it’s no surprise that the level of interaction between pro triathletes and their fans is unparalleled on Facebook, and no one interacts better than Jesse Thomas.

Your guide: Jesse Thomas (@JesseThomasTriathlete)

His squad: 13,000+ followers

Why Facebook: Thomas loves the back and forth that Facebook fosters. “The nature of comments being arranged the way that they are lets you answer and engage in side questions that fans ask,” says Thomas. He also loves the way that Facebook posts don’t simply disappear and move down the timeline like other social media sites. “Facebook gives better priority to top content versus more recent content,” Thomas adds.

Study the best: Thomas recommends diving in and following the triathletes that people love, like Jan Frodeno and Craig Alexander. “I’d follow your favorite athletes, or those you’ve heard have good social media presences, and see what they do,” he says.

Be honest, make friends, get followers: Thomas suggests knowing your audience and participating in the discussion with them, not just at them. While many of Thomas’ most popular posts are after big wins, sometimes people like to see the other side of the sport. “Sometimes big disappointments [are popular], I think because I’m honest and open about them,” he adds. “Like when I got a drafting penalty and had a super disappointing finish at the 2015 70.3 world championship.”

Favorite personal posts: It’s family first. “[My favorite post] was something around my kid,” he says. “Jude and I doing the Kona Underpants Run comes to mind, or getting ready for Kona with him on the trainer. I mean, those are my favorite moments in life.”

Favorite Facebook pages to follow: “Picky Bars, of course,” says Thomas of his obvious affinity for his and his wife’s nutrition bar company. “Outside of that, I think Linsey Corbin, who gets some great help with photo and video from her husband Chris. They do a phenomenal job. Plus, they’re just good, authentic people.”


Instagram.com/compimagephoto

Pro Photo Tips For Top Social Pics

Photos are key to the social media game, so take some expert advice from international triathlon photographer Paul Phillips’ 14-year career in the biz:

„“Shoot from an angle that is not normally seen by Instagram users,” says Phillips. “Try a high angle or a low angle for something more interesting.”

„“Pick the background and let the action happen,” he says. “No matter if it is a race, training or just a scenic photo, make sure you have a ‘clean’ background that does not distract from the subject.” Philips’ favorites include a bare shoreline, a row of trees or a hillside—avoid parked cars or storefronts.

„Phillips also recommends doing a little editing on your social snaps before “going live.” “You can easily make a few simple adjustments in iPhoto that can be done in less than a minute to change the cropping, straighten the image and adjust the exposure,” he says.

„One of Phillips’ big rules for any photog: “Never let people see the bad stuff. If it’s a bad photo, don’t post it.”

To see what a true pro posts, check out Paul Phillips’ snaps on Instagram and Twitter
@CompImagePhoto.

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Triathletes Share Their Travel Bloopers http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/lifestyle/triathletes-share-travel-bloopers_301755 Thu, 18 May 2017 20:55:53 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301755 Four triathletes share their top "uh oh" travel moments. Learn from their mistakes!

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Four triathletes share their top “uh oh” travel moments. 

“In 2013, I traveled to Brazil for the FAST Triathlon with two other American pros. Unknown in the U.S., the three-stage team sprint event is nationally televised live in Brazil. We won, but only after the race director told Tommy Zaferes between stages to slow down—he was almost lapping the field, and it didn’t make for good TV.” —Retired pro triathlete Chris Foster

“My husband and I were on the way to pull a double race weekend at the Deuces Wild Triathlon Festival in Show Low, Ariz.: a half-iron race one day, an XTERRA the next. Our Chevy Blazer coughed its last breath six hours out. We towed it to Phoenix, spent an entire day haggling with a Jeep dealer, then made it to Show Low in our new (used) ride five hours before the XTERRA start and raced the hell out of it.” —Erin Beresini, Triathlete Editor-in-Chief

“Years ago, my husband and I flew to Panama with some friends for an off-road triathlon, and everything that could go wrong did. Our bike boxes got caught up in customs for hours. It rained buckets on us during a course pre-ride. There were scorpions scuttling across the hotel room floor. But come race day, the experience was nothing short of epic. My husband and I both ended up on the podium. The prize? Chicken dinner.” —Julia Beeson Polloreno, Triathlete Editor at Large

“The first ever ITU Cross Triathlon Worlds was held in the remote city of Extremadura, Spain. I stayed with a group of pro women from Canada and the U.S., none of whom spoke Spanish. When I landed in Madrid, I was informed that my bike had not made the trip, I spoke into Google Translate to the hostess at our villa while she communicated with the baggage department about my lost luggage. In the end, they did not deliver the bike in time, so I borrowed a bike to race. After the extremely muddy race, I arrived home to see my bike waiting on the veranda, sparkling clean, ready to fly home.” —ITU Cross world champ and three-time XTERRA world champ Melanie McQuaid

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3D Printing Is Changing The Concept of Custom Gear http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/gear-tech/3d-printing-changing-concept-custom-gear_301749 Thu, 18 May 2017 20:09:06 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301749 3D printing helps these three companies create bespoke gear for discerning triathletes.

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3D printing helps these three companies create bespoke gear for discerning triathletes. 

As futuristic as it sounds, 3D printing can trace its roots to the basic ink jet printer. The revolutionary step to 3D printing occurred in 1983, when engineer Charles Hull invented the stereolithograph, a machine that could make 3D objects from a digital file using UV light and photopolymer, a honey-like substance. The next big innovation came soon thereafter when engineers at the University of Texas at Austin created the selective laser sintering (SLS) machine. SLS uses lasers to fuse together materials layer by layer. These technologies are how gear companies are now making custom items for triathletes who crave the perfect fit. Below, three brands leading the charge.

Skelmet Falcon 1 Sunglasses

$229–$439, Skelmet.com

What started out as an idea in November 2014 to create truly custom sunglasses using 3D technology became a company with a working prototype just one short year later. After finalizing the suppliers and manufacturing process, co-founders Rain Wang, a mathematician and Miss Universe Canada finalist, and electrical engineer James Cao launched Skelmet on Indiegogo in February 2017, and they’ve already surpassed their funding goal of $20,000. Buyers begin by scanning their head using the free Skelmet app. Then Skelmet prints your glasses using nylon filament for better flexibility and weight (they come in at a scant 17 grams, about the weight of three nickels). The hingeless design does help create a custom fit but also makes them harder to store. They don’t look any different than other sunglasses, but they do flex a bit more without feeling flimsy. Available in graphite black, sapphire black or white, five lens tints are available as are polarized lenses (lenses can be swapped out) plus there is a prescription lens option. If you have struggled to find a pair of sunglasses that are just right, or want the absolute lightest sunglasses, these are for you.

XLAB Custom Mounts

$30–$40, Xlab-usa.com

While XLAB hydration and fueling products fit the majority of bars on the market, there are a few exceptions. Some aerobars measure more than 22.2mm in diameter, and some athletes put their bars so wide that the standard clamps for XLAB’s Torpedo Versa System are inadequate. To combat this problem, XLAB 3D prints special clamps custom fitted to your bars ($30 for the clamps that fit oversized bars, $40 for the clamps that expand the mounting width). You send your bar specs to XLAB, who will print your clamp in 3 to 10 days using a high-strength polyamide plastic. From a distance, these parts are indistinguishable from the standard XLAB components. Upon closer inspection, they have a slightly rough texture and you can just make out the small lines that formed during the process. They feel every bit as hard and durable as any other bracket, so don’t be concerned about their longevity. Only available via special order, interested buyers can contact Sales@xlab-usa.com.

Raceware 3D Mounts

Prices vary, Racewaredirect.co

Based in the U.K., Raceware got its start in 2012 and has an impressively large line of computer and camera mounts and brackets created using the 3D process. Specific to triathletes, they also offer bar end plugs and disc valve hole covers too. Raceware uses nylon filament for its products in order to offer colors other than black, and select products can be made using carbon fiber. The nylon offers a bit more flexibility than plastics, which is needed to be able to get the mount onto the bar, but is still plenty durable for everyday abuse. Buyers can choose from 11 colors, and you can even add your own name.

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7 Nutritious Spring Fruits and Veggies http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/nutrition/7-nutritious-spring-fruits-and-veggies_116726 Thu, 18 May 2017 16:30:48 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=116726 Spring-season fruits and veggies are at their peak and therefore contain the highest nutritional value.

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Photo: Shutterstock.com

Now is the time for a fresh start utilizing all the clean, bright produce the season has to offer. Spring-season fruits and veggies are at their peak and therefore contain the highest nutritional value. Don’t miss out on some simple ways to use some of our favorites, many of which were recommended by growers at a local farmers’ market.

Guava

Give your diet a vitamin C and fiber boost by adding the flesh of this sweet, tropical fruit to smoothies, or take advantage of its naturally high pectin content by making jam or fruit sauce. Guavas are best stored out of the fridge until they soften or are cut open.

RELATED: Enjoy Fruits Year-Round

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Triathlon Training Plan: 6 Weeks to Your Fastest Swim http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/training/triathlon-training-plan-6-weeks-fastest-swim_301733 Thu, 18 May 2017 14:05:25 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301733 Instead of suffering through the swim to get to the bike and run, learn to embrace this first crucial leg and set yourself up for a successful triathlon.

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Instead of suffering through the swim to get to the bike and run, learn to embrace this first crucial leg and set yourself up for a successful triathlon.

Having confidence and speed in the swim kicks off your race in a positive direction. Instead of playing catch-up once you get out of the water, this six-week program will help you supercharge your freestyle stroke so you can ride and run with the best of them.

This plan should work as a complement to your bike and run training. Identify the key swim workouts and plan your other training to not leave you excessively fatigued for the key swim days.

Swim as your first workout of the day whenever possible so you are fresh and get the most out of the session.

About the program

Swims listed are 2000–3000 in length. Before beginning this program, you should already be comfortable swimming three times per week, 2000–3000 per practice.

During most weeks, there are five workouts listed. If you need to swim less or more, increase or decrease the main set up to 30 percent. It is important that you plan for the proper warm-up and cool-down—don’t cut corners there. If you need one fewer swimming day, take Monday off. Also, if you have shoulder issues, avoid using paddles.

Weeks 3 and 6 are lower volume to allow for some recovery. You should coordinate these weeks with your bike and run recovery week as well.

Pacing goals for the swim sets are based on your goal 1500 pace (to approximate an Olympic-distance triathlon swim). If you are unsure of your goal pace, swim a 1500 for time, pacing it out at your very best effort. Set a training goal to swim 30 seconds to 1 minute faster than this. Calculate what your average pace per 100 would be to achieve your 1500 goal (i.e., if you swim 31:00, set a goal of 30:00, or 2:00/100 yards). In week 3, when you swim an 800 time trial, you may reassess that goal if you have improved significantly.

This program emphasizes six kinds of swims:

1. Technique/recovery
On Monday, which is a classic recovery day, the focus is on technique and easy, efficient swimming.

2. Pace work
This swim works primarily on achieving your goal 1500 time. You gradually work toward more volume at goal pace. This is useful for learning even pacing.

3. DPS/technique
DPS is “distance per stroke.” Reducing the number of strokes per length means you are pulling more water and gliding more efficiently.

4. Aerobic power
These are sustained sets of aerobic swimming that build endurance. Swimming is slightly slower than goal 1500 pace, but still at a firm, steady rhythm and challenging effort level.

5. Strength and open-water swim skills
This can be done in open water or in the pool, ideally with training partners. Incorporate wetsuit swimming, open-water skills and pull buoy and paddle swimming.

6. Time trial Practice
Your “race warm-up”and then swim time trials to build fitness, learn pacing and gauge progress. There are some 400 time trials associated with the aerobic power days, and longer time trials on your lower volume weeks to take advantage of a rested body.

Pool drills listed in the program:

» 6 Kick*
Without a kickboard, kick on your side with your lead hand forward in a glide position, and opposite hand at your side by your thigh. After six kicks, take a stroke and switch sides. Repeat. This drill works on body rotation, alignment and balance. Keep your body in line and the palm of your hand, lat muscle and hip toward the bottom of the pool. Try not to turn your head more than necessary when breathing.

» Corkscrew
Alternating freestyle and backstroke for the indicated number of strokes—for instance, “free 6/backstroke 5.” Feel the stretch and strong arm pull as you propel yourself from your front (freestyle) onto your back (into backstroke) and when you go from back to front again. Try to be tall and aligned as you rotate from front to back to front.

» Single Arm*
Swim freestyle with only one arm. There are two options here: The non-swimming arm is either at your hip (advanced), or stays extended at the front in a glide position (beginner). Alternate 25 left arm, 25 right arm.

» Closed Fist
Swim regular freestyle but close both hands into a fist. This forces you to use your forearm and inside bicep as a paddle rather than relying only on your hands.

» Pause 1, Pause 3, Pause 5
With these drills you pause at the finish or push phase of your stroke for approximately 1⁄2- 3⁄4 second with your hand by your upper thigh. This makes sure you are fully finishing the push phase of your stroke and gives you time to rotate into a proper extended glide position, which you can then try to emulate within your regular freestyle. Pause 1 has a split-second pause every stroke, while Pause 3 is every third stroke, and Pause 5 is every fifth.

» Pause 1 with Closed Fist
This combines Closed Fist Drill with Pause 1.

*Some less experienced athletes may need fins for these drills.

Build Open-water Skills

Sighting: Do some “head-up freestyle” in the pool, lifting your goggles, nose and then chin for up to a 50. Increase your kick slightly as you sight.

Starts: In the pool, try timed 50s with a deep-water, or floating, start with no push off the wall. Position your body horizontally with your feet near the surface while floating on your stomach; this will help to give you maximum acceleration. When practicing a beach start, lift your feet and knees above the water as you run. Think about how the trailing leg of a hurdler clears a hurdle. When you dive into the water, create a streamlined position and break the surface with 10–15 strokes of a quick sprint, keeping your head low.

Exits: Swim until you can touch the bottom, or if possible, utilize dolphin dives until the water is just above your knees then run to exit the water. Initially, try this alone at 80 percent of maximum speed, then work up to doing it at 100 percent.

Drafting: Drafting in open water will eliminate drag by 20–30 percent. In the pool, experiment with swimming on someone’s hip or feet (just be sure to ask them first!). Try to have a couple of simple tech- nical reminders that bring your focus back to key elements of your stroke.

Your Race Warm-up

If possible, get in the water for 10–15 minutes before your race. Start out with a nice, easy 3–4 minutes of swimming. Do two or three sets of 20 to 30 strokes of drills followed by some pick-ups to engage your muscles in a race-specific range of motion, and to get your blood pumping. You should also use this time to familiarize yourself with the course. What are you going to be looking for toward the water exit? Is there a large buoy that is easy to see, or a tall building or tree that would be better for sighting purposes? Finish your warm-up with a few good exhales and some confidence-building thoughts.

Coaching Abbreviations/Terminology

WU = warm-up | MS = main set | CD = cool-down | OW = open-water | D = drill | k = kick | Free = freestyle | Non-free = backstroke, breast stroke or butterfly. | P = pull | Ppdl = pull with paddles | DPS = distance per stroke | X’ = X minutes, i.e. 3’ | X” = X seconds, i.e. 30” | (brackets) = time indication for rest in between intervals or tasks, i.e. 4 x 3’ (2’) | F = Fast | eZ = easy | TT= time trial | Alt = alternate | HR = heart rate

Week 1

Monday
Swim: Technique/recovery, 2000. WU: 200 free. MS: 8×100 alt drill and free. 4×50 K. 6×100 alt drill and free. Keep it aerobic and take as much rest as needed. CD: 200 non-free. Drills: 6 Kick, Closed Fist, Corkscrew (free 6/backstroke 5).

Tuesday
Swim: Pace work, 3000. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K), 4×50 surge as 20 F/30 EZ. MS: 20×100 (15”) at goal 1500 pace + :02/100. CD: 200 choice. Drills: Single Arm, Pause 1.
*Performance Pointer* Tuesday and Friday are your most intense and impactful swim sessions of the week. Plan your bike and run training to make sure you are rested for these swim workouts.

Wednesday
Day off

Thursday
Swim: DPS and technique, 3000. WU: 2x(100 free, 4×50 D/free). MS: 3 x [4×50 D (15”) 8×50 (15”) DPS. Count strokes and time.]. 6×50 K (20”) descend 1-3. CD: 100 free, 100 non-free, 100 free. Drills: Pause 1, Pause 3.
*Performance Pointer* DPS swimming isn’t easy swimming. The idea is to go as fast as possible with a low stroke count. This means slowing your stroke down, and pulling the water hard. It should feel quite muscular. Elite age-group swimmers will take less than 15 strokes per 25yd doing DPS.

Friday
Swim: Aerobic power, 3000. WU: Race warm-up ~600. MS: 400 TT. Record 100 splits to assess pacing, and finishing HR for TT. 200 EZ. 10×150 (15”). 1500 pace + :03-:05/100. CD: 200 non-free, 2×50 K.

Saturday
Day off

Sunday
Swim: Strength and open-water skills, 3000. WU: 200 free. 2×50 D, 200 free, 2×50 D, 100 free, 2×50 D. MS: 1000 wetsuit swim, build pace by 200 from easy to fast. Wetsuit off. 3×200 Ppdl (20”). 4×100 P (20”) (no paddles). All steady aerobic. CD: 4×50 alt non-free/ free. Drills: Head-up freestyle, sighting every 5 strokes.

Week 2

Monday
Swim: Technique/recovery, 2000. WU: 200 free, 100 non-free, 100 K. MS: 8×100 as 50 D, 50 free. 5×100 easy with great technique. Take as much rest as needed. CD: 6×50 alt non-free and free. Drills: 6 Kick, Closed Fist, Corkscrew (free 6/backstroke 5).

Tuesday
Swim: Pace work, 3000. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K), 4×50 as 25 F/25 EZ. MS: 4×200 (30”) at goal 1500 pace + :03/100. 8×100 (20”) at goal 1500 pace + :01/100. 8×50 (15”) at goal 1500 pace. CD: 200 choice. Drills: Single Arm, Pause 1.
*Performance Pointer* A well-executed pace work set often feels like a building effort. Start the set strong, but in control. Don’t be afraid to work really hard for the last few intervals, as this is where you make your fitness gains.

Wednesday
Day off

Thursday
Swim: DPS/technique, 3000. WU: 200 free, 2×100 K, 200 free, 6×50 descend 1-3. MS: 2x[4×50 D (15”) 12×50 DPS (15”). Count stroke and time. 6×50 K (20”) descend 1-3. CD: 200 non-free. Drills: Pause 1, Pause 3.
*Performance Pointer* While Monday and Thursday swims are lower intensity, make sure you are mentally engaged. These are your days to improve your technique and set up your stroke for better performances on Tuesdays and Fridays.

Friday
Swim: Aerobic power, 3000. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100D, 100 K). MS: 10×200 (15”). 1500 pace +:03-:05/100. CD: 2x(100 non-free, 2×50 K).

Saturday
Day off

Sunday
Swim: Strength and open-water skills, 3000. WU: 200 free. MS: 1500 wetsuit swim at 1500 non-wetsuit pace – :02-:03/100. 5×200 OW skills: Sighting, drafting, starts, turns. CD: 100 free, 100 K, 100 free.

Week 3: Lower-Volume Week

Monday
Day off

Tuesday
Swim: Pace work, 2500. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K), 4×50 surge as 30 F/20 EZ. MS: 10×100 (20”), 10×50 (15”) all at goal 1500 pace. CD: 200 non-free. Drills: Single Arm, Pause 1.

Wednesday
Day off

Thursday
Swim: DPS/technique, 3000. WU: 200 free, 8×50 as 25 D, 25 K, 2×100 as 25 F/25 EZ. MS: 5x(200 DPS, 100 non-free, 2×50 D). Count strokes and time. CD: 100 free, 100 non-free. Drills: Pause 1, Pause 5.

Friday
Swim: Time trial, 2500. WU: Race warm-up protocol ~600. MS: 800 TT, 200 EZ, 200 TT, 200 EZ, 50 TT for time. Record 100 splits to assess pacing, and finishing HR for all TTs. CD: 9×50 alt free, kick and non-free.
*Performance Pointer* A well-paced TT starts out vigorous but in control for the first quarter, feels like good work in the second quarter, and is sheer guts in the fourth quarter. It is in the third quarter that athletes usually attain their personal best, by staying determined and taking some risk when it feels hardest. Get excited about doing a great job in the third quarter!

Saturday
Day off

Sunday
Swim: Strength and open-water skills, 2000. WU: 300 free. MS: 5×200 (20”) wetsuit swimming. Build pace from #1 to #5 from easy to fast. 5×100 OW skills: Sighting, drafting, starts, turns. CD: 100 non-free, 100 K.

Week 4

Monday
Swim: Technique/recovery, 2000. WU: 200 free. MS: 8×100 alt drill and free. 4×50 K, 6×100 alt drill and free. Keep it aerobic and take as much rest as needed. CD: 200 non-free. Drills: 6 Kick, Closed Fist, Corkscrew (free 6/backstroke 5).

Tuesday
Swim: Pace work, 3000. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K), 4 x 50 as 20 F/30 EZ. MS: 4×200 (30”) 8×100 (20”) 8×50 (15”) all at goal 1500 pace. CD: 200 choice. Drills: Single Arm, Pause 5.
*Performance Pointer* As you fatigue, continue to pay attention to technique. you want to train efficient biomechanics, not sloppy swimming.

Wednesday
Day off

Thursday
Swim: DPS/technique, 3000. WU: 2x(100 non-free, 100 free, 4×50 as 25 drill/25 free). MS: 2x[6×50 D(15”) 5×100 DPS (15”). Count strokes and time. 4×50 K (30”) descend 1-4. CD: 100 free, 100 K, 100 D, 100 free. Drills: Pause 3, Pause 1 with Closed Fist.

Friday
Swim: Aerobic power, 3000. WU: Race warm-up protocol ~600. MS: 400 TT. Record 100 splits to assess pacing, and finishing HR for TT. 8×200 (15”). Short rest, steady aerobic. 1500 pace + :03-:05/100. CD: 200 choice, 4×50 K.

Saturday
Day off

Sunday
Swim: Strength and open-water skills, 3000. WU: 200 free. 2×50 D, 200 free, 2×50 D, 100 free, 2×50 D. MS: 1000 wetsuit swim, build pace by 200 from easy to fast. Wetsuit off. 2×300 Ppdl (25”). 8×50 P (15”) (no paddles). All steady aerobic. CD: 4×50 alt non-free/free. Drills: Head-up freestyle, sighting every 5 strokes.

Week 5

Monday
Swim: Technique/recovery, 2000. WU: 200 free, 100 non-free, 100 K. MS: 8×100 as 50 D, 50 free. 5×100 easy with great technique. Keep it aerobic. CD: 6×50 alt non-free and free. Drills: 6 Kick, Closed Fist, Corkscrew (free 6/backstroke 5).

Tuesday
Swim: Pace work, 3000. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K), 4×50 as 25 F/25 EZ. MS: 4×300 (20”) at goal 1500 pace + :02/100m. 100 EZ. 14×50 (10”) at goal 1500 pace. CD: 200 choice. Drills: Single Arm, Pause 5.

Wednesday
Day off

Thursday
Swim: DPS/technique, 3000. WU: 200 free, 100 K, 100 non-free, 6×50 D as 25 D/25 DPS, 6×50 descend 1-3. MS: 1200 DPS (Countstroke for 1×50 every 200). 4×100 K as 50 F/50 EZ. CD: 200 free, 100 D, 100 non-free. Drills: Pause 3, Pause 1 with Closed Fist.

Friday
Swim: Aerobic power, 3000. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K). MS: 5×400 (20”). Short rest, steady aerobic. 1500 pace + :03- :05/100. CD: 2x(100 non-free, 2×50 K).

Saturday
Day off

Sunday
Swim: Strength and open-water skills, 3000. WU: 200 free. MS: 2000 wetsuit swim at 1500 non-wetsuit pace. 5×100 OW skills: Sighting, drafting, starts, turns. CD: 100 free, 100 K, 100 free.
*Performance Pointer* You have practiced your open-water skills for a few weeks. Continue to challenge your comfort zone by trying different drafts, navigating through people and experiencing more contact. Doing this in a safe, friendly environment will broaden your skill set and increase your comfort level on race day.

Week 6: Lower-Volume Week

Monday
Day off

Tuesday
Swim: Pace work, 2500. WU: 2×300 (100 free, 100 D, 100 K), 4×50 as 30 F/25 EZ. MS: 10×100 (20”), 10×50 (15”) all at goal 1500 pace. CD: 200 choice. Drills: Single Arm, Pause 1.

Wednesday
Day off

Thursday
Swim: DPS/technique, 2000. WU: 200 free, 2×50 D, 2×50 K, 2×100 as 50 EZ/50 F. MS: 2x(200 DPS, 50 non-free, 4×50 D). Count strokes and time. CD: 200 non-free. Drills: Pause 3, Pause 1 with Closed Fist.

Friday
Swim: Time trial, 2500. WU: Race warm-up protocol ~600. MS: 1500 TT. Record 100 splits to assess pacing, and finishing HR for TT. CD: 2x (2×50 free, 50 K, 50 non-free).
*Performance Pointer* Visualize a great performance here. Embrace the effort. you have worked hard through this program and deserve a good result!

Saturday
Day off

Sunday
Swim: Strength and open-water skills, 2000. WU: 300 free. MS: 4×300 (30”) wetsuit swimming. Build pace from #1 to #4 from easy to fast. 300 OW skills: Sighting, drafting, starts, turns. CD: 100 non-free, 100 K.

Lance Watson, LifeSport head coach, has trained a number of Ironman, Olympic and age-group Champions over the past 30 years. He enjoys coaching athletes of all levels. Contact Lance to tackle your first Ironman or to perform at a higher level. For more training tips, visit LifeSport Coaching on Facebook or on Twitter at @LifeSportCoach.

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How to Avoid the Zone 3 Plateau http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/training/avoid-zone-3-plateau_301727 Wed, 17 May 2017 22:38:32 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301727 Do you find yourself validating a good run with average pace? Have to catch that runner up ahead of you on the path, so you […]

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Do you find yourself validating a good run with average pace? Have to catch that runner up ahead of you on the path, so you drop the pace and push a little harder? Desperate to break the four-hour marathon barrier or to get yourself under 1:30 in the half? Do you find that even though you’re pushing yourself harder and harder, you don’t see the results in races? The truth is that you’re likely in a Zone 3 plateau, which means you’re probably pushing too hard too often, and not running slow enough, often enough. It doesn’t matter your pace, slowing down to go faster is the real deal.

Base is the place

For runners, there is little better for you than slow Zone 2 base running. Many runners push the Zone 2 work out of the way in favor of Zone 3 work. Runners fall into the trap that running harder more often will lead to better results. However, Zone 3 work is above aerobic pace and has some lactate response. Basically Zone 3 isn’t hard enough to elicit a desirable physical adaptation, and yet it’s too hard to allow for day-to-day recovery.

Constantly pushing in Zone 3 day after day is a habit of the time-crunched runner, where mileage and average pace is the only validator of training. This athlete can often find themselves in a rut and left wondering how they could work so hard for so little results. As mentioned above, continual Zone 3 work doesn’t allow for enough recovery and puts the athlete in a state of continuous fatigue. No wonder we call it feeling “hammered out!” So how can we get out of the rut, and back to PR’s?

Create disparity in your training

The first rule is that you want to keep your easy days truly easy, and your hard days hard. An easy hour in Zone 2 will always provide a better benefit than a moderately hard Zone 3 effort for that same hour. You want to create a schedule that allows you to run easy days in Zone 2 to illicit a recovery response, increase aerobic capacity and increase fatty acid usage. The latter is a major benefit of Zone 2 running, true aerobic running will make you a better fat burner. Zone 3 running will leave you burning a mixture of carbs and fat, never making you super efficient at being a carb burner or fat burner!

Simply put, your hard days should be hard! With a high heart rate in Zone 4/ Zone 5 for increasingly longer periods (in accordance to your race goals). There is no major benefit to be gained from Zone 3 when you could be doing high-end Zone 4 and Zone 5 (Threshold/ VO2 Max). The benefits for speed, lactate endurance and metabolism are maximized when you’re doing top-end Zone 4 and Zone 5 work. This is where you become efficient at mitigating lactic acid, more efficient at burning carbs, and thereby reach your optimal performance.

Related from Trainingpeaks.com: Why Runners Should Train on Pavement

Creating the perfect plan

So what’s the time-crunched athlete to do? How do you create a schedule that allows us to capture the benefits of spectrum running? What else can I do to help break through?

The first thing an athlete adopting this methodology needs to do is to throw away their “average pace” ego. Validating a run on average pace alone is a dangerous proposition, leading you directly into a hard run at the cost of recovery and adaptation. The two best things you can do are to invest in a heart rate monitor and calculate your pace zones based on a recent race effort.

Every hard day should be followed by one or two days of easy running. For example:

This schedule allows for adequate recovery, maximizes time, and allows even the time-crunched athlete to get in two high quality workouts a week. A majority of athletes will see a big jump in fitness when they slow down and put the energy they saved on Zone 2 days into the hard Zone 4/ Zone 5 days.

You can determine your increase in fitness by doing periodic fitness tests on your hard days to see if you are increasing. You can also determine the right number of zone 2 recovery days by finding your resting HR and checking it in the morning to see if you’re recovered enough to do high-end work. This method is called heart rate variability training, and it can be very helpful for preventing overtraining.

Desperate to break through

If you’re desperate to break through and you’re pushing yourself to the brink run after run, try taking a “run slower to get faster approach” to your running. Your mileage may be lower at first but the aerobic benefit you’ll receive will outweigh the loss in mileage. Try utilizing the methods and schedule above to structure your training to see success at your next major race. Most athletes see a jump in fitness after four weeks and the biggest jumps after between four and 12 weeks.

This article originally appeared at Trainingpeaks.com.

Andrew Simmons is a USATF Level 2 and TrainingPeaks Level 2 certified coach and the founder/head coach of Lifelong Endurance. Athletes who want to improve their race times in distance running have found major success with his Individual Coaching and Training Plans. Andrew resides in Denver, Colo., where he still trains as a competitive amateur. Follow Coach Andrew on Facebook , Instagram, and Twitter.

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Trek Brings Back a ’90s Trend for a 2017 Purpose http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/gear-tech/trek-brings-back-90s-trend-2017-purpose_301722 Wed, 17 May 2017 20:37:14 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301722 Neon colors, and lots of them, adorn the frames of many a pro this year.

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Trends are cyclical—wait a few decades, and those bell-bottom jeans or Hammer pants in the back of the closet become hip and retro instead of a fashion faux pas. Triathlon, too, follows this pattern: for evidence, look no further than the recent resurgence of beam bikes or 70.3 world champion Tim Reed’s dedicated campaign to bring back the mustaches and skimpy race briefs of triathlon’s forefathers.

It makes sense, then, that the latest bikes from Trek have a retro twist. Neon colors, and lots of them, adorn the frames of many a pro this year, including Holly Lawrence, Linsey Corbin and Reed (no, he hasn’t chosen to color-coordinate his Budgy Smuggler briefs). The Wisconsin-based bike company is bringing back the ’90s with safety in mind.

As part of their “Always Be Seen” campaign to promote safety for cyclists, Trek’s design team sought to develop bright colors best spotted by motorists. What they discovered, however, was that their best option already existed: their Radioactive palette, which comes in fluorescent shades of yellow, orange, green and pink, had been lying dormant for a few years, waiting for the trend to come back.

“It turned out we have had these colors in our offering for quite some time,” says Michael Mayer, Road and Triathlon Brand Manager at Trek. “It started as a trend color—I think it was 1991. It was a good year for hi-vis.”

It’s hard to imagine a neon color going unnoticed for almost three decades, but as neon’s popularity fizzled out, consumer demand for the Radioactive palette followed suit. Only recently has it seen a resurgence—not for trend, but for safety. Modern cyclists want to make it impossible for motorists to miss them; they light up their bikes like a Christmas tree and eschew dark colors for the most blinding contrast possible. Neon gets the job done.

“Bike safety is very important to our riders,” says Mayer. “[The Radioactive colors] are highly visible. They’re loud. It addresses the need for visibility and safety.”

Mayer says the trick to bringing neon back has been finding the right balance of color and style—unlike the ’90s, a bike fully swathed in Radioactive Yellow is not as popular as one with a bit more design flair. The 2017 version utilizes the “Hilo Pro” paint scheme: Radioactive Yellow is the primary color, with Viper Red and Trek Black accents. This design is available on most road, mountain and triathlon bikes from Trek, including their popular Speed Concept triathlon model.

For added visibility, Mayer suggests installing daytime running lights as well as highlighting as much of the body as possible with fluorescent and reflective clothing. The Radioactive color palette is also utilized on select Trek clothing and helmets. Or, if you’ve been in this sport for a while, you probably have some ’90s neon gear tucked away in the closet somewhere.

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Mirinda Carfrae on Her First Year Missing Kona Since 2009 http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/lifestyle/mirinda-carfraes-season-change_301713 Wed, 17 May 2017 19:52:55 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301713 The 36-year-old hopes to come back to Kona stronger than ever and “be able to stand on top of the podium being a mom as well as a triathlete.”

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There will be a familiar name missing from this year’s Ironman World Championship start list. Three-time Ironman world champion Mirinda “Rinny” Carfrae has made the start in every Kona race since 2009, finishing on the podium in seven of those attempts—but this year represents a season of change for Carfrae and her husband, fellow professional triathlete Timothy O’Donnell, as she is expecting their first child this August. Though she is enjoying her time away from structured training, the 36-year-old hopes to come back to Kona stronger than ever and “be able to stand on top of the podium being a mom as well as a triathlete.” We chatted with Carfrae about the news, her plans for a return to racing and who she thinks is capable of competing with Daniela Ryf at the big race in October.

Triathlete.com: It’s been an eventful year! Talk to me about how it’s gone so far.

Carfrae: The year has been completely different for me. Obviously we fell pregnant pretty quickly. Post-Kona, knowing we wanted to try to start a family but not knowing how long it would take, we decided to have a plan A and a plan B. Plan A would be we’d fall pregnant and I’d take the year off and we’d have a baby, and plan B was the normal year if it didn’t happen quickly. It was a bit of an adjustment—a very welcome one. After 15 years of having a strict schedule starting on January 1 and doing hard training and preparing for a hard season of racing—not having that to think about was an adjustment at first, but it’s been a really nice change for me. I’m excited for this next chapter in our lives.

Triathlete.com: How have your sponsors received the news that you’d take the year off?

Carfrae: Everyone has been great. That was nerve-wracking—I’m sure for any woman—having to go to a boss, or in my case sponsors, and say “I’m not going to be racing this year.” In the past few years I’ve been quite open and honest about the fact that at some point we would start a family and that would be a year out of racing for me. It wasn’t completely out of the blue. The majority of my sponsors have continued to sponsor me to the full capacity that they did before. A couple of them maybe decreased my base salary by 20 or 30 percent but then added an extra year on my contract, so it’s gone as well as I could have hoped.

Triathlete.com: I’m curious as a two-triathlete household, how has that dynamic been different with Tim still training heavily and less of a focus on your racing right now?

Carfrae: That’s been really fun for me actually. We both are always focusing on Kona and trying to support each other with whatever we have left at the end of the day, but really realizing that we need to focus all of our attention to get the best out of ourselves. For me to be able to step back and pick up the slack a little bit around the house and then also being able to come and support him and be on the sidelines on his races. I would never come and just watch him race if I was racing myself. I was either competing or was back home training.

Carfrae on her way to second place at the 2016 Ironman World Championship. Photo: Paul Phillips/Competitive Image

Triathlete.com: Has taking a break from competitive racing given you any kind of different perspective on the sport?

Carfrae: Not really a different perspective. More that you start to appreciate what you’ve done in the sport, and I think while you’re racing and while you’re in it, it’s hard to have perspective on your own career and your accomplishments. But the hunger is still there. I’m following the competitive races. I’m watching the trends and seeing how the girls are racing. I’m hungry to get back out there and compete again. Sometimes it’s nice to take a step back to appreciate where you’ve come from and what you’ve been able to accomplish.

Triathlete.com: If everything goes to plan, what do the next 18 months look like for you?

Carfrae: If everything goes to plan, I would like to be back racing in probably March or April next year. The baby will hopefully come on time, which would be early August so that will hopefully give me six or seven months before I would start racing. I hope to be ready to race an Ironman by June in 2018 and then prepare for Kona. The goal is to get back to Kona at full strength. Hopefully by June I can race pretty well over the Ironman distance. That’s the dream plan anyway, we’ll see.

Triathlete.com: Is there anything in your career that you want to do before you retire?

Carfrae: There are things I still want to do. I’d love to go back to Kona and go faster than I’ve gone before, but looking back at my career I’ve won Kona three times and that’s always been my goal in the sport. To be at the top of my game and be able to win that world title multiple times. I can’t really complain about my career and what I’ve done. If it were all to end tomorrow, I would be pretty happy with how it’s all gone and what I’ve accomplished. I definitely want more. I want to be able to win another world title. I want to be able to stand on top of the podium being a mom as well as a triathlete.

Triathlete.com: You mentioned you still follow the pro women and what’s going on with the sport. Going into Kona, there’s going to be an interesting conversation because everyone looked at you versus Daniela [Ryf, the defending two-time champion]. Is there anyone on your radar that you think is going to be capable of making a run for the title?

Carfrae: Obviously Daniela has just set herself apart, especially with her performances last year in Roth, Switzerland and Kona. That triple was kind of unprecedented in our sport. I think she will definitely be the overwhelming favorite going into the race. I think Kaisa Lehtonen. She started training with Siri [Lindley, Carfrae’s coach] this year. She raced pretty well against Daniela in South Africa earlier this year. I believe she’ll be on the podium in Kona. Heather Jackson is another one that will be right up amongst in the running for another podium. If Rachel [Joyce] can get enough points, which kind of sucks that she has to chase points because she’s such a phenomenal athlete in Kona and would be one of the podium getters. She’s going to struggle to get enough points to get back to Kona, but if she can get there she’ll be back on the podium. Watching her over the past month or so she just looks phenomenal. I’m really enjoying watching her come back to race after having Archie.

Triathlete.com: The Kona feature from A&E networks’ digital platforms was recently released. How did the A&E/Lifetime partnership come to be?

Carfrae: Basically a couple of weeks before Kona last year my manager asked if we would be open to have someone filming us race week. That A&E would be capturing some footage and figuring out a way to help promote the sport and help myself and Tim. Kona week is always a real touchy time for us. We worked with a videographer [Jianca Lazarus] who was phenomenal. She was a local who lived in Oahu and came in and really was a fly on the wall and really didn’t interrupt any of our preparation. It was a no-brainer to be involved with A&E—that’s one of the requests that you seriously consider when they knock on the door. It’s been really good. It was quite easy for us to get the footage on race week and we’re planning to push forward and do a couple of projects with our story evolving and the baby joining the family. I think it will be a cool story to follow. Hopefully we can keep it interesting enough for the viewers.

Watch the feature from A&E Network’s’ Digital platforms and Lifetime here or below.

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4 Tri Legends Named as Collins Cup International Captains http://www.triathlete.com/2017/05/news/4-tri-legends-named-collins-cup-international-captains_301711 Wed, 17 May 2017 13:55:30 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=301711 Craig Alexander, Simon Whitfield, Erin Baker and Lisa Bentley have been named International captains.

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On Tuesday, the Professional Triathletes Organization (PTO) announced three-time Ironman world champion Craig Alexander, two-time Olympic medalist Simon Whitfield, two-time Ironman world champion Erin Baker and 11-time Ironman winner Lisa Bentley as the Team International Captains for next year’s Collins Cup, an event loosely modeled after golf’s Ryder Cup.

The event will take place next June, and organizers are slowly revealing the details. So far, we know it will will be a long-distance team competition among USA, Europe and “International” teams. Each team will consist of 12 professional triathletes, six men and six women. The first eight athletes on each team will be chosen based on standings in the PTO’s own ranking system, with the team captains choosing the final four. Tri legends Dave Scott and Karen Smyers will be USA’s team captains, and Wellington and Stadler will lead Europe’s team. Alexander, Whitfield, Baker and Bentley will oversee the “Internationals.”

The next big question to be answered is, where will the first Collins Cup take place?

“Since we announced Chrissie and Norman as our European Captains, and lined up our International Captains, a bun fight has broken out as to where we should hold the first Collins Cup as a number of different locations have contacted us,” Charles Adamo of the Professional Triathlon Organization told Triathlete.com. “We hope to finalize our decision by no later than August.”

Review what we know so far about the Collins Cup here. We’ll post more details about the race as they’re announced.

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