Triathlete.com http://www.triathlete.com The latest triathlon gear, training, nutrition, photos, races, movers, shakers, and more Wed, 16 Aug 2017 22:56:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 http://www.triathlete.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/apple-touch-icon-180x180-120x120.png Triathlete.com http://www.triathlete.com 32 32 Swollen Knee? Here’s How to Treat and Prevent It http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/training/swollen-knee-heres-treat-prevent_304806 Wed, 16 Aug 2017 22:56:20 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304806 A swollen knee is never normal and warrants a trip to the doctor.

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A swollen knee is never normal and warrants a trip to the doctor. But for the medical sleuths among you, here’s how to assess the situation—and prevent it from happening again.

A swollen knee may also be painful, stiff and keep you from fully extending your leg. To figure out why it’s swollen, identify when it first puffed up.

Within an hour or two of activity: Swelling that occurs soon after an activity is much more serious than swelling that shows up, say, the next day. Example: You twist your knee trail running and it swells up. This is a sign of bleeding within the knee, or hemarthrosis. Basically, something has been torn or broken. About 80 percent of hemarthrosis cases are caused by a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). Sudden-onset effusion is a sign that something serious is going on.

Hours later or the day after activity: Swelling that arrives later is generally caused by excess synovial fluid (the lubricant in joints) in the knee, much like too much oil in a car. Overuse and an underlying medical condition are the most common causes.

Something in there is irritated or rubbing during activity, and the body responds by over-lubricating the knee to compensate. Osteoarthritis is one of the most common causes, but far less common maladies can also be the culprits, such as rheumatoid arthritis, infection, gout, bursitis, cysts, bleeding disorders, tumors and Lyme disease. Advancing age and participation in sports that require sudden changes in speed and direction raise your risk.

Fix It

See a doctor. Anytime you have a swollen joint, you should see a doctor. This is especially true with sudden-onset effusion

Employ dynamic rest. Even if the swelling comes without pain, avoid loading the knee until the swelling subsides. Trade knee-loading exercises for intense upper-body and core work.

Ice it. Apply ice for 15 minutes 4–6 times a day for the first two days of swelling. Elevating the knee as you ice it can also help reduce the swelling.

Prevent It

Strengthen your legs. Strong legs protect your knees. Be sure your workout regimen includes regular lower-body strength training in addition to any running, and biking that you do. You may not be able to prevent knee effusion caused by health issues, but properly trained legs will help your knees recover in the long run no matter what the issue turns out to be.

When to Call a Doctor

My philosophy is that any time you have joint swelling, you should see a doctor because you need to figure out what the problem is. Try to pinpoint when the effusion began in relation to your athletic activities, especially if your knee has swelled up with no discernible cause such as an overt injury and you have no other symptoms that suggest a related illness. A physician can help shed light on the mystery, whether by physical exam, analysis of fluid drawn from the knee, or review of images such as MRIs or X-rays.

Also, if the knee is swollen but has some extra symptoms like redness or warmth of the skin and/or you have a fever, it could signal an infection. Get to an ER pronto.

More Med Tent

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2017 Ironman 70.3 World Championship Pro Start List http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/ironman/2017-ironman-70-3-world-championship-pro-start-list_304791 Wed, 16 Aug 2017 21:18:30 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304791 Ironman today revealed the 101 professional athletes who will toe the line in Chattanooga.

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Ironman today revealed the 101 professional athletes who will toe the line at the 2017 Ironman 70.3 World Championship on the weekend of Sept. 9 and 10 in Chattanooga, Tenn. Professional and age-group women will kick off the action on Saturday (Sept. 9), with the professional and age-group men following on Sunday (Sept. 10).

Highlighting the starts lists are defending 70.3 world champions Tim Reed (AUS) and Holly Lawrence (GBR).

In addition to Lawrence, the women’s field will see two recent champions racing to regain their world titles. The 2014 and 2015 70.3 world champion, and defending Ironman world champion, Daniela Ryf (SUI) will compete after a disappointing performance at last year’s race. Also vying for the title will be 2011 and 2013 Ironman 70.3 World Championship winner and last year’s Ironman 70.3 World Championship runner-up Melissa Hauschildt (AUS). Ryf and Hauschildt both have an opportunity to become the first triathletes to win three Ironman 70.3 World Championship titles.

On the men’s side, Reed will also face several former champions. Sebastian Kienle (GER), who was the 2012 and 2013 70.3 world champion and the 2014 Ironman world champion, will be looking to become the first man to win three Ironman 70.3 World Championship titles. This year’s world championship also sees the return of 2014 Ironman 70.3 world champion and 2015 Ironman 70.3 runner up, Javier Gomez (ESP) to the start line after an accident in 2016 sidelined his goals of an Olympic medal in Rio. Two-time winner Michael Raelert will be looking for his first return to the top of podium since his last win in 2010.

There are a few notable names missing from the men’s start list. A nagging hip injury and season ending surgery has put the much anticipated debut of two-time Olympic gold medalist Alistair Brownlee on hold for this year. Canadian Lionel Sanders, who had said he would spend 2017 focusing on this race, changed his mind and will again pursue the Ironman distance. Two-time Ironman world champion Jan Frodeno, who won the 70.3 world title in 2015, has again decided to focus on his Kona prep in lieu of making the start.

Check back to Triathlete.com in the coming days for a complete race preview and pick up the September issue of Triathlete for a complete feature on Holly Lawrence. 

Last year’s podium: Mel Hauschildt (2nd), Holly Lawrence (1st) and Heather Wurtele (3rd). Photo: Matt Roberts/Getty Images for Ironman

Women

1 Holly Lawrence (GBR)
2 Annabel Luxford (AUS)
3 Laura Philipp (GER)
4 Jeanni Seymour (RSA)
5 Sarah Crowley (AUS)
6 Melissa Hauschildt (AUS)
7 Ellie Salthouse (AUS)
8 Emma Pallant (GBR)
9 Heather Wurtele (CAN)
10 Daniela Ryf (SUI)
12 Lesley Smith (USA)
14 Haley Chura (USA)
15 Alicia Kaye (USA)
16 Amelia Watkinson (NZL)
17 Jennifer Spieldenner (USA)
18 Lauren Brandon (USA)
19 Helle Frederiksen (DEN)
20 Magali Tisseyre (CAN)
21 Lisa Huetthaler (AUT)
22 Natalie Seymour (GBR)
23 Sue Huse (CAN)
24 Kimberley Morrison (GBR)
25 Barbara Riveros (CHI)
26 Stephanie Roy (CAN)
27 Judith Vaquera (ESP)
28 Anna Eberhardt (HUN)
29 Agnieszka Jerzyk (POL)
30 Diana Riesler (GER)
32 Laurel Wassner (USA)
33 Ruth Brennan Morrey (USA)
34 Sarah TRUE (USA)
35 Allison Linnell (USA)
36 Alice Hector (GBR)
37 Pamela Tastets (CHI)
38 Heather Jackson (USA)
39 Jenny Schulz (GER)
41 Maria Czesnik (POL)
42 Monica Juhart (AUS)
43 Robin Pomeroy (USA)
44 Lisa Roberts (USA)
45 Romina Palacio Balena (ARG)
46 Sarah Lester (AUS)
47 Rachel Joyce (GBR)
48 Kirsty Jahn (CAN)
49 Carolina Furriela (BRA)
50 Jen Annett (CAN)
51 Astrid Stienen (GER)
52 Annett Jalowi (GER)
53 Luiza Cravo De Azevedo (BRA)
54 Valerie Belanger (CAN)
55 Amanda Wendorff (USA)
56 Ewa Komander (POL)
57 Hannah Drewett (GBR)
58 Angela Naeth (CAN)

Tim Reed is the defending champion. Photo: Matt Roberts/Getty Images

Men

1 Tim Reed (AUS)
2 Sam Appleton (AUS)
4 Tim Don (GBR)
5 Sebastian Kienle (GER)
7 Andreas Dreitz (GER)
8 Tyler Butterfield (BER)
9 Mauricio Mendez Cruz (MEX)
10 Rodolphe Von Berg (USA)
11 Michael Raelert (GER)
12 Javier Gomez (ESP)
14 Maurice Clavel (GER)
15 Taylor Reid (CAN)
16 Antony Costes (FRA)
17 Kevin Collington (USA)
18 Matt Hanson (USA)
20 Joe Gambles (AUS)
21 Ivan Tutukin (RUS)
23 Tim O’Donnell (USA)
24 Mario De Elias (ARG)
25 Denis Chevrot (FRA)
26 Jesse Thomas (USA)
27 Carlos Javier Quinchara Forero (COL)
29 Pieter Heemeryck (BEL)
30 Brent McMahon (CAN)
32 Jackson Laundry (CAN)
33 Yvan Jarrige (FRA)
34 Matt Chrabot (USA)
35 Felipe Van de Wyngard (CHI)
36 Michael Weiss (AUT)
37 James Cunnama (RSA)
38 Patrick Dirksmeier (GER)
39 Reinaldo Colucci (BRA)
41 Harry Wiltshire (GBR)
42 Drew Scott (USA)
43 Ivan Kalashnikov (RUS)
44 Chris Leiferman (USA)
45 David Plese (SVN)
46 Antoine Jolicoeur Desroches (CAN)
47 Ben Kanute (USA)
48 Igor Amorelli (BRA)
49 Fraser Cartmell (GBR)
50 Trevor Wurtele (CAN)
51 Alan Carrillo Avila (MEX)
52 Eric Watson (BHR)
53 Alexander Polizzi (AUS)
54 Adam Otstot (USA)
55 Guy Crawford (NZL)

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Canyon Has Landed in the U.S. http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/bike/canyon-landed-u-s_304798 Wed, 16 Aug 2017 20:35:56 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304798 Canyon Bikes, a direct-to-consumer brand that has become a ubiquitous name in Europe has finally opened in the U.S.

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Canyon Bikes, a direct-to-consumer brand that has become a ubiquitous name in Europe has finally opened in the U.S.

After months of waiting, delays, silence and more waiting, the direct-to-consumer bike brand Canyon Bikes has finally opened its website’s doors to the U.S. market. The brand that has sat underneath Jan Frodeno for both of his Ironman World Championships in 2015 and 2016 is now available to U.S. customers as well.

“The past few months have obviously been very intense, integrating personnel, an ERP system, a CRM system, and web software,” says Blair Clark, President of Canyon USA. “The employees are passionate about creating an emotional connection between our customers and our bikes. Our team demands the best results from one another and along the way wants to build the best bike company. Often when I’m out riding my Canyon, I get the same two questions: ‘When can I buy one?’ Or, ‘Where can I test one here?’ It’s incredibly rewarding now to be able to say, ‘Go to our website—you can order one of these legendary bikes today and you have 30 days to try it out for yourself.”

Canyon began in 1985 under the name of Radsport Arnold. After years as a garage business, founder Roman Arnold changed the name in 2002. Headquartered in Koblentz, Germany, Canyon now has a full-range of road, mountain, triathlon, fitness, and urban bikes.

With a new U.S. office located in Carlsbad, Calif., Canyon has gone from cult following to transition-area mainstay on the other side of the Atlantic. This year at Challenge Roth, Canyon crept dangerously close to Cervelo’s throne at our very own bike count—finishing in a tight second place, ahead of Specialized and Felt among others. It’s likely that the brand’s Euro popularity will also launch Canyon inside the top ten at Kona’s bike count.

While Canyon boasts some impressive tech in its bikes, one of the most interesting aspects of the brand is its direct-to-consumer business model. Rather than going through a retailer, Canyon sells manufacturer direct—their bikes are not available in stores anywhere. Instead, customers enter their measurements into an online fit system, where the correct size is calculated. After payment, the bike is then (mostly) assembled and shipped in a specially-designed bike box right to the purchasers front door. They also offer a 30-day return policy and an impressive six-year warranty.

Though the newly-launched U.S. website only shows their midrange Speedmax CF 7.0 in the triathlon category (as of writing, the bike was displayed, but not available for sale), much of their high-end road and mountain range was available for purchase. Representatives told us that the response has already been overwhelming—hence the soft rollout—but expect models to become available as soon as they hit the brand-new U.S. warehouse.

For more information, go to Canyon.com

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How to Qualify for XTERRA Worlds (Because Who Doesn’t Want to Race in Maui!?) http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/lifestyle/get-qualify-xterra-worlds-doesnt-want-race-maui_304786 Wed, 16 Aug 2017 13:06:31 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304786 If you want to experience the off-road race of a lifetime—swimming with turtles, biking and running among pineapples—here’s what you gotta do to nab one of the approximately 750 spots.

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This year’s XTERRA World Championship takes place on Oct. 29. (If you’re planning ahead, other future dates are October 28, 2018 and October 27, 2019). If you want to experience the off-road race of a lifetime—swimming with turtles, biking and running among pineapples—here’s what you gotta do to nab one of the approximately 750 spots. 

The race season is underway, with 42 races in 33 countries around the world offering qualification opportunities. There are several ways to punch your ticket to this iconic event. If you live in the U.S. or Canada, travel is most convenient to the Pan-American (a series of 10 events connecting South, Central and North America) or the America Tour (45 races just in North America, divided into eight regions). There is also an Asia-Pacific Tour and a European Tour option for globe-trotting triathletes, but we’re sticking with your qualifying options from events in North, Central and South America.

Earn a qualifying spot at a Pan-American Tour event

Each event in the Pan-American Tour is ranked gold or silver. The gold events have 51 qualifying spots that go to the top five in each age group and roll down until all spots are filled. Gold events in North America include XTERRA Oak Mountain (Alabama), XTERRA Beaver Creek (Colorado), XTERRA Mexico and XTERRA Ogden (Utah). Silver events have 26 qualifying spots given to the top three in each age group and roll down until they are filled. XTERRA Victoria (British Columbia) is the silver-level event in North America.

So placing top five at a gold event and top three at a silver event will automatically qualify you for Maui. Athletes have two weeks to sign up for Maui before their spot will roll down to the next qualified athlete.

Win your age group overall on the Pan-American Tour

The Pan-American Tour has 10 stops throughout North, Central and South America and awards points depending on your placement within your age group (first place gets more points than second, etc.). The age-group champions are the athletes who have amassed the most points by the end of the tour. Since all races count, this system rewards athletes who race frequently but might struggle to crack the podium. These slots do not roll down. 

Win your age group regional championship on the American Tour

XTERRA identifies eight regions in the U.S. with qualifying events. Athletes score points by placing in the top 15 at 45 races held in 30 states. At least one scoring event must be in their home region, and otherwise points can be earned at any race on the American Tour. Just like on the Pan-American Tour, the athlete with the most points wins the region and a spot to Maui.

Athletes have until Aug. 26 to race at least two events vying for the regional America Tour title in their age group. If an athlete who has automatically qualified for Maui also wins the region, that spot will roll down to the next placing athlete in the region. 

Score a spot at Canadian events

There are Canadian events that are not part of either series but offer 15 automatic qualification spots. These include XTERRA Canmore (Alberta) and XTERRA Quebec. These 15 spots are given out to the winner in each category based on the date the athlete signed up to race. There are 24 age groups, so spots will not be offered to every age group. There is incentive to sign up for the race early, as this will determine the order in which spots are offered to qualified athletes.

For the XTERRA Sleeping Giant (Ontario) event, six automatic qualifying spots will be offered the top three male and female age-groupers overall. If a spot isn’t taken, it will roll down to the next overall athlete in that gender.

Finally, there is a series bonus of qualifying spots for participation in a combination of XTERRA Parry Sound and XTERRA Mine over Matter. These two Ontario races offer 14 Maui spots as a series bonus for best two combined finishes. The Maui spots are given away equally to seven men and seven women, divided among 10-year age groups (even though Maui divides age groups into five-year increments). Athletes earning the qualification have one week to accept their spot in Maui before it is rolled down to the next qualified athlete.

For a complete schedule, list of qualifying races, description of the America Tour regions and a breakdown of how points are allocated, go to Xterraplanet.com/worlds/qualify.

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How Sleep Deficit Is Killing Your Athletic Performance http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/training/sleep-deficit-killing-athletic-performance_304783 Tue, 15 Aug 2017 22:13:05 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304783 If sleep deficit is chronic, the effects become physiological.

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Eight hours of shut-eye a night, maybe more in heavy training phases—that’s the goal. But by the time you add in work, family, a rudimentary social life, basic home biohazard control, and dental flossing, you’re looking at six hours—if you’re lucky.

But what the heck, if you’re walking and talking like a boss, is lack of sleep really affecting your athletic performance?

According to Steve Magness, sports scientist, coach and author of Peak Performance, it’s a matter of degree, duration, and understanding what you’re dealing with: sleep deprivation or sleep deficit. Sleep deprivation refers to total lack of sleep, usually for a limited amount of time. Sleep deficit happens when you’re chronically getting below optimal sleep levels. “So, if you’re only getting five hours of sleep a night five days out of the week, you’re building a sleep deficit of two to three hours a night that accumulates over time,” Magness says. The greater the deficit, the greater its effect on athletic performance.

Most studies, Magness says, use sleep deprivation, keeping participants awake for anywhere from 24 to 48 hours. Mentally, results show some lack of alertness, slower reaction time and slightly reduced cognitive ability, but little reduction in muscle function or power output. Good news!

“So, a night here or there of poor sleep, or not sleeping the night before a race is not going to have much effect on performance,” he says. “That is, if the athlete is healthy and generally well rested.”

Sleep deficit, on the other hand—the category lots of busy people fall into—does affect athletic performance. “Psychological effects show up before large physiological effects—things like increased perception of effort—everything seems harder—giving up on the task sooner, less willpower, increasingly negative thoughts and outlook.”

If sleep deficit is chronic, the effects become physiological. Stress hormones—specifically cortisol—stay elevated, and growth hormones meant for muscle repair drop. Chronically elevated cortisol levels are not only a result of sleep deficit but can also keep you awake in the limited amount of time you’ve got between the sheets, so the problem snowballs. “Elevated cortisol levels cause your body to stay in a catabolic state—muscles are breaking down, and at the same time, the repair process is impeded,” Magness says.

The result? Endurance drops, actual power output is reduced, chance of injury increases, and that’s on top of the mental muck that’s happening between the ears.

“It’s a matter of degree,” Magness says. “If the race is short enough or the sleep deficit not that great, there’s a possibility there’d be no impairment of performance. But in an endurance event, even if the deficit is just enough to produce a negative mood or greater perceived effort without affecting actual muscle function, performance will be affected detrimentally.”

Part of athletic success is overcoming obstacles, like the sleep deficit that comes with a night class or a new baby. Magness suggests some real-life hacks for minimizing real-life sleep deficit. For example, go to bed an hour earlier in the week prior to a race. By banking sleep against travel days or night-
before nerves when you know you’re not going to sleep well, you ensure sleep loss doesn’t affect you as much.

Sometimes it’s easier to fit in an hour of down time during the day than tacking it on at night. “Naps are important. If you’re not getting enough sleep on a regular basis, naps make you feel a lot fresher. It’s a psychological boost,” he says.

And day of race? “Taking caffeine before a race counteracts sleep loss, at least temporarily, and helps with mental focus,” says Magness.

One caveat: Over-the-counter sleep aids, Magness warns, may help you sleep initially but come up short in quality of sleep. When you factor in residual morning sluggishness, they’re really not a
practical solution.

RELATED: A Triathlete’s Guide to Sleep

Snooze for Recovery

Don’t just lie there—harness the power of advanced sleep technology. While these products can’t guarantee more hours of shut-eye, they claim to make your sleep more comfortable, more restful, and thus more effective in aiding recovery.

Under Armour’s Tom Brady Recovery Sleepwear is printed inside with a “bioceramic” material that absorbs body heat and reflects it back to the skin as far infrared, a type of thermal radiation that’s known to stimulate recovery in cells and tissue. Underarmour.com

Sheex Performance bedding transfers nearly 50 percent more heat and moisture away from your body than cotton sheets. More comfortable sleep is more restful sleep, the Sheex peeps figure. Sheex.com

Bear foam mattress seems to do both, reflecting back healing infrared radiation and keeping you cool and comfortable via better airflow. Bonus: It’s also made from eco-friendly foam. Bearmattress.com

RELATED: Build a Better Nap

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How I Fuel: As an XTERRA Regional Champ http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/xterra/fuel-xterra-regional-champ_304780 Tue, 15 Aug 2017 20:18:17 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304780 Kyle Grieser’s love of fried chicken has helped him score 13 XTERRA regional championship titles.

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Kyle Grieser’s love of fried chicken has helped him score 13 XTERRA regional championship titles.

Kyle Grieser, 34
Location: Marble Falls, Texas
Occupation: Firefighter

Standout results: 13-time XTERRA South regional champion; two-time overall winner at XTERRA Epic Rustman; overall winner at XTERRA Epic Iron Mountain

Backstory
Kyle Grieser started racing (road) triathlon in high school “as something else to do and keep me in shape,” he says. After his freshman year of college, his parents bought him a mountain bike, and he raced his first XTERRA in 2003 “and never looked back.” He’s racked up a lot of wins in his off-road tri career, including 13 XTERRA South Regional Championship titles. But he has yet to test himself on the world stage—even though his regional wins qualified him for the XTERRA World Championship those 13 years, this November will be the first time he’s actually raced in Maui. He put off worlds mostly because of the cost, “but now I am ready to do it,” he says. “I would like to show up and do very well.” Grieser’s favorite thing about XTERRA is “the people—they are just amazing people and so friendly,” he says. “Everybody wants to help each other out, kind of like when I first started racing years ago.”

Pre-race breakfast: “Whole grains like cereal or granola and some kind of fruit juice.” “I don’t believe in fueling during a race. I believe if you are doing a race that takes less than 2.5 hours, you should have fueled enough beforehand. Racing something that short, you should be at such a fast pace your body doesn’t have time to metabolize anything, so taking anything in won’t help. I also train like a race, so during my training I don’t drink or eat, so when it comes to a race my body is used to it. But for longer races, I do just drink water and I will have some Power Gels that I will take every 30 minutes.”

Pre-race dinner: “I carb-load. I like to eat pasta the night before, and two nights before as well. I usually do a whole-wheat pasta with marinara sauce, most of the time either with sausage or chicken. Every now and then I’ll splurge and do a pesto. I might put a little light mozzarella on it. I try to get lots of veggies all day long as well.”

Post-race meal: “This is the only reason I race—after I am done, I go straight over to Chicken Express and get fried chicken, fried okra and sweet tea. This is all I can think about while I am racing. Sweet tea is the trick to everything—gives you just the right amount
of sugar.”

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Photos: 2017 ITU World Cup Yucatán http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/photos/photos-2017-itu-world-cup-yucatan_304749 Tue, 15 Aug 2017 19:58:22 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304749 Mexico's Irving Perez and the United States' Summer Cook earned the victories at the 2017 Yucatan ITU World Cup over the weekend.

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Mexico’s Irving Perez and the United States’ Summer Cook earned the victories at the 2017 Yucatan ITU World Cup over the weekend. 

Men’s Race
Returning to the world cup podium for the first time since 2015, Perez became the first-ever champion of the 2017 Yucatan ITU World Cup. His blazing performance on the run earned him the victory, which was celebrated with crowds cheering the word “Mexico” as the win came once again for Perez in front of a home crowd.

“I am very happy for this victory. This is my second time that I win here in Mexico, the last time was in Huatulco and now in Yucatan where it is hot, but for me it is better. I am very happy with my team and with my coach,” Perez said of his win. “I see this podium today and I worked very hard. The water was very one, two, three, fight and the bike was very technical and the running was very hard, but it was good for me.”

Women’s Race
After having a breakthrough 2016 season and stepping onto four world cup podiums, the win was long overdue for the American as she will be named the first-ever Yucatan champion.

Cook battled for the gold from start to finish as she remained among the leaderboard throughout the entire race. The win was then earned from a stellar running performance that drew her enough of an advantage to easily seize the finish tape.

Cook said of her cruising victory, “This is the first time on the podium at a world cup for me this year, so I am really happy to be back on the podium and I am hoping to carry this onto the rest of my races this season.”

Read the complete men’s and women’s race recaps at Triathlon.org.

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Why You Should Have a Triathlon Alter Ego http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/video/triathlon-alter-ego_304745 Tue, 15 Aug 2017 15:53:30 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304745 The solution to mental blocks? Pretend to be someone else. "Fake it until you make it."

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Some of us don’t feel like athletes. Some of us don’t feel worthy enough to have a coach. Some of us don’t feel like we should be out there because we’re not good enough, fast enough, etc. The solution to these mental blocks? Pretend to be someone else. “Fake it until you make it.” Dr. Simon Marshall and Lesley Paterson are here to help you win the brain fight with their new book, The Brave Athlete.

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One-Hour Workout: Swim Drill Building Blocks http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/training/one-hour-workout-swim-drill-building-blocks_304741 Tue, 15 Aug 2017 13:12:14 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304741 “In order to build a successful house, there needs to be a stable and dependable foundation."

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Every Tuesday we’ll feature a different coach’s workout you can complete in 60 mins (or less!)

This week’s workout comes from Liz Hinley, a multisport coach with KMF Performance, based out of Denton, Texas. She is certified with USA Triathlon (Level II), USA Swimming, USMS (Level II), and has a 200-hour Yoga Alliance teacher certification. She is currently earning her master’s degree in kinesiology with a concentration of sport and exercise psychology at the University of North Texas.

“In order to build a successful house, there needs to be a stable and dependable foundation,” Hinley says. “As an athlete working on one’s swimming, visiting the basics to develop, improve, or maintain the foundation of swim technique is important. In the following set, you will find three of my go-to drills that break down the freestyle stroke and aid in perfecting one’s technique.”

“Drill #1 is a streamline drill to focus on body position, posture, and hydrodynamics. Here you will push off the wall in a streamline position with your arms extended above and pressed behind the head, core stretched, and legs long behind the body (no kicking!). Hold this position until you lose momentum or need to take your first inhale, then complete the length of the pool with a freestyle stroke trying to recreate the stretched and engaged streamline effect.”

“Drill #2 is a six-kick switch drill that works on rotational balance, glide stability, and kick timing. Start in a side kick position, full extension of your glide, and start counting your kicks. After six, you will rotate to the other side, hitting and holding that strong glide position. The switch comes quick—be sure to be ready on counts five and six.”

“Drill #3 is a fist drill that focuses on core drive and arm position for the catch and pull. Similar to how boxers initiate their punches from the core, we swimmers “punch” into our glide from the core’s rotation. Drive your fist into the glide (as aggressively as needed to help engage from the core), anchor the fist and forearm into the high-elbow catch position, and pull yourself forward to the anchored spot using the entire arm surface as your paddle.”

Beginner

Warm-up:
2x 100 swim/100 kick

Main Set:
4×25 drill with 30 seconds rest
2×100 freestyle with 30 seconds rest (Apply the drill to your stroke)
3x each set (first round: Drill #1; second round: Drill #2; last round: Drill #3

Cool-down:
100 easy, relax the mind 

Total: 1400

Intermediate

Warm-up:
2x 100 swim/100 kick

Main Set:
8×25 drill with 20 seconds rest
4×100 freestyle with 20 seconds rest (Apply the drill to your stroke)
3x each set (first round: Drill #1; second round: Drill #2; last round: Drill #3

Cool-down:
200 easy, relax the mind

Total: 2600

Advanced

Warm-up:
2x 200 swim/100 kick

Main Set:
8×25 drill with 10 seconds rest
6×100 freestyle with 10 seconds rest (Apply the drill to your stroke)
3x each set (first round: Drill #1; second round: Drill #2; last round: Drill #3

Cool-down:
100 easy, relax the mind 

Total: 3800

More one-hour workouts

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Are These $975 Cycling Shoes Worth the Price Tag? http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/gear-tech/975-cycling-shoes-worth-price-tag_304737 Mon, 14 Aug 2017 20:31:58 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304737 D2's brand-new TriWire cycling shoes are hand-tailored heaven for your feet.

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D2’s brand-new TriWire cycling shoes are hand-tailored heaven for your feet. 

D2 Shoes owner, Don Lamson, began his custom shoe career in cycling more than 30 years ago. No single person has more experience in the sport. He creates each and every shoe in his 1,800-square-foot workshop north of Los Angeles. The painstaking process takes about four to six weeks and involves only himself and his master stitcher, Hakob Sargsyan, so you can be sure your shoes are truly handmade by the best. Lamson has more than 700 combinations of lasts, sizes and widths to help him accommodate anything your feet can throw at him, including a left foot that’s bigger than the right. We felt the difference in pedal-to-foot connection right away, and we were able to keep the straps super tight without any numbness or discomfort. We also loved the hands-on approach that Lamson takes from initial fit to foot follow-up and adjustments. Custom colors? Obviously. Worth the cash? Consider it an investment in your comfort and efficiency—especially if you have a tough time fitting off-the-shelf shoes.

  • Inside is a custom orthotic made of cork-loaded EVA for high-density support and low weight.
  • Each pair of TriWire shoes is pre-marked and drilled for optimal cleat position (extra holes too!). In-person laser alignment is also available post-production at no extra charge.
  • Performance sailcloth made with carbon fiber sandwiched between mylar layers creates zero stretch, excellent power transfer and awesome detailing.
  • The Boa closure system allows a super-tight fit in the custom footbed and a wide opening for quick transitions on and off the bike.
  • Uni-directional carbon is laid up in a special configuration for maximum stiffness and minimal weight.

$975, D2shoe.com

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Photos: 2017 Ironman Hamburg http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/race-coverage/photos-2017-ironman-hamburg_304684 Mon, 14 Aug 2017 19:50:25 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304684 South Africa’s James Cunnama took control of the men’s race at the inaugural Ironman Hamburg from the get-go. Seven years after winning Ironman Florida and celebrating a […]

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South Africa’s James Cunnama took control of the men’s race at the inaugural Ironman Hamburg from the get-go. Seven years after winning Ironman Florida and celebrating a lot of podium finishes in the meantime, Cunnama again soaked in the experience of winning an Ironman title. He put together a 49:05 swim, a 4:24:31 bike and a 2:40:58 marathon to narrowly miss a sub-8 hour finish, crossing the line at 8:00:36.

One week after her 29th birthday, Germany’s Daniela Sämmler exited the water in first place and then hammered on the bike. The only sub-5 bike split in the women’s field on a cool and windy day in Hamburg was Saemmler’s key to earning the win. Thanks to good running conditions, she had no reason to worry about her chasers in the marathon. She crossed the finish line with a dominant win in 9:07:49.

Read the complete recap at Ironman.com

2017 Ironman Hamburg
Hamburg, Germany – Aug. 13, 2017
2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike, 26.2-mile marathon

Men
1. James Cunnama (RSA) 8:00:36
2. Horst Reichel (GER) 8:22:27
3. Markus Fachbach (GER) 8:25:36
4. Carlos Lopez Diaz (ESP) 8:35:36
5. Alexander Chilling (GER) 8:42:05

Women
1. Daniela Sämmler (GER) 9:07:49
2. Eva Wutti (AUT) 9:23:35
3. Kristin Moeller (GER) 9:39:43
4. Sandra Wassink-Hitzert (NED) 9:48:37
5. Verena Walter (GER) 9:52:03

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Tri University: A Guide to Nabbing an Ambassadorship http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/lifestyle/tri-university-guide-nabbing-ambassadorship_304656 Mon, 14 Aug 2017 17:57:18 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304656 Many triathletes seem to have them, but the details on fostering that key relationship with an endurance company is shrouded in mystery.

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Recent Penn State grad Kristin Goett dishes out advice for the U23 crowd (and the U23 at heart) in her Tri University column.

Ah, yes. The elusive world of ambassadorships. So many triathletes seem to have them, but the details on fostering that key relationship with an endurance company is shrouded in mystery—until now. Welcome to your tell-all guide about what companies look for in their ambassadors, what to expect from a company’s offer and what your responsibilities may be. Get ready to have some serious knowledge dropped!

‘Tis the Season

One of the most frequently asked questions when it comes to ambassadorships is when to reach out to companies. When you cross your last finish line sometime around October, your season is not yet over. The ambassadorship season has, in fact, just begun. Look for applications and contact information to begin popping up any time from August to October. After all, endurance organizations want to give you every opportunity to accumulate bragging rights during your stellar season. You’ll use those hard-earned talking points to flesh out those glittering applications, which brings us to our next topic…

Be Yourself

While being yourself is excellent advice for all facets of life, it is exceptionally important to adhere to when answering calls for ambassadorships. Although you might think you’re being clever by over-stating your success or passions, most organizations are pretty good at sifting through those who only apply for the free product.

To add legitimacy to your applications, create an account with Athlinks. This will help verify your results and add a touch of professionalism to any app. Likewise, don’t be afraid to add some personality to your responses. Are you witty? Let the company know by throwing in some intelligent syntax. Do you really like post-race beer? Detail your favorite IPA and why it is undoubtedly a better recovery drink than chocolate milk. In essence, stay true to yourself in all areas of life—but mostly in triathlon.

Set Some Expectations

Alright, let’s get real for a second. Chances are, you are not a professional triathlete. Not that you aren’t great—I, for one, think you are—but there are far more age groupers reading this than pros. So let’s set some expectations about ambassadorships.

That being said, what you can realistically expect from an ambassadorship is some free product and some freakin’ awesome discounts. Companies like Run Gum offer quarterly free shipments of the caffeinated gum to its ambassadors, while others, such as Nuun, provide steep discount codes unique to its ambassador team. The important thing to remember is that every little bit helps. No ambassadorship will set you up with all the equipment you need, but they are an excellent resource for age groupers and can be an invaluable stepping stone to those looking to make the jump to pro.

Let’s Get Mutual

There is no such thing as a free lunch, no matter how hard triathletes try to mooch off of our favorite mid-ride cafes. This rule also applies to ambassadorships, and it is an important note to internalize: Ambassadorships are a mutual relationship.

When applying to ambassadorships, do your research. Reach out to current product ambassadors and ask what their responsibilities are. Do you need to put on wellness events in the community? How many social media posts are required per month? Is there a sales quota with a discount code? These are all important questions to consider before clicking the “submit” button on your application.

The worst mistake you can make when acquiring ambassadors is to over-commit yourself and become a poor ambassador. Be honest with your schedule, your passion for the product and your desire to be a community influencer before you delve in full throttle.

Establishing relationships with triathlon companies is both helpful and fun. It’s only August, so keep attaining those magnificent results, stories and relationships that will be the kindling of what will undoubtedly be a totally fire application for the companies of your choosing. Good luck!

A Place to Start

There are several companies that offer ambassadorships, but here are a few of the most popular in the triathlon space.

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Video: An Exercise To Improve Shoulder Health And Function http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/training/monday-minute-standing-one-arm-cable-row_5678 Mon, 14 Aug 2017 16:05:20 +0000 http://running.competitor.com/2011/10/videos/monday-minute-standing-one-arm-cable-row_6638 This week we show you the standing one-arm cable row, an exercise that helps improve shoulder health and function.

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This week we show you the standing one-arm cable row, an exercise that helps improve shoulder health and function. This is a great exercise for athletes who need to improve posture or have poor arm carry due to an old injury or previous condition.

More “Monday Minute” videos

RELATED: Shoulder Exercises For A Stronger Swim

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A Pre-Race Routine For Every Triathlon Distance  http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/training/pre-race-routine-every-triathlon-distance_136019 Mon, 14 Aug 2017 13:46:57 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=136019 Don’t spoil the big event by just waiting around for the race to start.

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You’ve put in the training, traveled to the race and set up all of your gear. Don’t spoil the big event by just waiting around for the race to start. A pre-race warm up can help your mental and physical performance throughout the race. Here are some distance-specific morning warm-up routines.

Sprint

The shortest events actually call for the longest warm-up. A sprint triathlon is a very intense race between 1–2 hours in length. Your heart rate will be elevated and your body will be producing high levels of lactate acid from start to finish. A long warm-up will awaken your body, increase your heart rate and prepare your musculature for the demands of the race.

Start on land to activate your lower body.

  • 3-minute walk
  • 5-minute easy jog
  • 3×20 second strides (build from an easy jog to a strong effort) with 40 seconds recovery walk between each

Change into your swimming gear and continue warming up in the water.

  • 1 minute getting comfortable in the water
  • 3-minute easy swim
  • 4×10 strokes fast with 20 strokes easy between each

RELATED: Train Hard For Your Next Sprint Triathlon

Olympic

Focus on preparing for a 1500-meter swim. The swim is long enough (20–40 minutes) that your body, heart and mind will be sufficiently activated for the remainder of the race. The focus of this warm-up is to get the pre-race jitters out of your system.

  • 5-minute easy walk/jog (optional)
  • 1 minute getting comfortable in the water
  • 5-minute easy swim
  • 4×20 strokes strong with 20 strokes easy between each

RELATED: Get In The (Pre-Race) Zone

Long distance (half or full Ironman)

Limit your physical warm-up on race morning to muscle activation and water acclimatization. Do a mental warm-up to go over key aspects of your race. Keep your core temperature low for as long as possible to minimize the effects of heat stress later in the day.

  • 10-minute visualization of your race
  • 1 minute getting comfortable in the water
  • 5-minute easy swim

RELATED: 4 Swim Sets For 70.3 Training

Warm-up tips

  • Plan your race morning schedule the day before and leave enough time to complete a warm-up before your wave starts.
  • Start with a walk/run on dry land. Stay off your bike as much as possible in the early morning hours when it’s still dark.
  • „USA Triathlon is encouraging more race directors to provide participants with a warm-up area in the water. Check with the race organizers ahead of time to understand the in-water warm-up policy.
  • Bring a towel or jacket to dry off and stay comfortable before your wave is set to start.
  • Sip on some water or energy drink after your warm-up to remain hydrated and to calm your nerves.

RELATED: Andy Potts’ Cold-Water Swim Tips

Cold weather or chilly water

„If you are easily chilled, the water temperature is very low, or it is a very cold day, complete all of your warm-up activities on dry land to prevent catching a chill after a pre-race swim.

„Always pack a set of stretch cords in your race bag. These can easily be attached to a fence post or other immovable object near the race site. Perform a few minutes of swim-specific drills to activate your arms and upper body.

„Pour warm (not hot) water into your wetsuit before the start of the race. This will reduce the influx of cold water from rushing into your suit when you first enter the water.

RELATED: Warm-Up Without Water: 4 Stretch Band Exercises

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These 4 Athletes Have Done Every Ironman on the Planet http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/ironman/4-athletes-done-every-ironman-planet_304675 Sat, 12 Aug 2017 13:14:00 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304675 There are currently four people in the Ironman World Finisher’s Club: Jeff Jonas, Luis Alvarez, John Wragg and Elizabeth Model.

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There are currently four people in the Ironman World Finisher’s Club: Jeff Jonas, Luis Alvarez, John Wragg and Elizabeth Model. On paper, club entry is simple: look at the current circuit of full-distance M-Dots. If you’ve done them all—doesn’t matter when—you’re in. New races that haven’t happened yet don’t count because no one could’ve done them.

The feat was simpler, but still tough, a decade ago, when there were about 20 full-distance races on the calendar. But two changes of ownership since then have brought rapid global expansion, doubling the world’s 140.6s. These four will spend the year tackling the newest Ironman events added to the lineup. We caught up with them prior to their finishes at Ironman Santa Rosa. This weekend they’re in Hamburg, Germany for the inaugural Ironman Hamburg.

Read a complete feature about Jeff Jonas in the September 2017 issue of Triathlete, on newsstands now

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These Mushroom Products Promise Energy-Boosting Effects http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/nutrition/mushroom-products-promise-energy-boosting-effects_304667 Fri, 11 Aug 2017 20:22:14 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304667 Some types of mushrooms promise immune- and energy-boosting effects—no trippin’.

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Some types of mushrooms promise immune- and energy-boosting effects—no trippin’.

Traditionally used in Chinese medicine, medicinal mushrooms caught the attention of Western wellness researchers who’ve been looking into the fungi’s potential to fight cancer, reduce inflammation and lower cholesterol, among other things. Now medicinal mushrooms, as extracts and powders, are popping up in everything from natural deodorants to instant coffee mixes, promising increased energy from the cordyceps variety and boosted immunity from reishi. But so far, their ergogenic effects remain unproven.

“The research I found reported no improvements in human performance, although there needs to be more research on how much to take and how often,” says triathlete and dietitian Chris Newport, M.S., R.D.N., who owns The Endurance Edge in Cary, N.C.

That’s not to say mushrooms don’t pack health benefits. They are the only vegan source of vitamin D, Newport says, and extracts contain polysaccharides and beta-glucans, compounds that can help activate the immune system by increasing white blood cell count. And there’s anecdotal evidence that mushrooms can help lower stress levels and provide a natural pick-me-up (perhaps after an early-morning training sesh?). Below, three mushroom-enhanced products to try.

Sun Potion Chaga Raw Mushroom Powder

Called the “King Healer” in Eastern traditional medicine, chaga mushrooms contain B vitamins and zinc. Straight mushroom powders like this one tend to have a neutral, subtly earthy taste, so they blend well with strong drinks—you can mix a teaspoon into your coffee or tea for almost no noticeable difference, or craft your own latte with a splash of milk. $48, Sunpotion.com

Health-Ade Kombucha Super-Tea Reishi-Chocolate

This organic drink pairs cacao with reishi mushroom powder, black tea and green tea. There are only hints of the cacao flavor in the aftertaste—and no actual mushroom taste. We found it a refreshingly bubbly afternoon pick-me-up. $3.99 for 16-ounce bottle, Health-ade.com

Four Sigmatic Mushroom Hot Cacao Mix

The “dark and spicy” flavor (also available in a sweet cinnamon flavor with reishi) of this tasty organic hot chocolate contains just four ingredients: cacao powder, coconut palm sugar, cordyceps mushroom extract and chili extract. Mix a packet with hot water, milk or coffee for a piquant blend. Four Sigmatic also sells mushroom-containing coffee mixes for the extra caffeine kick. $20 for 10 packets, Foursigmatic.com

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Perk Up Your Training with an Adventure on the Train http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/lifestyle/perk-training-adventure-train_304662 Fri, 11 Aug 2017 18:09:46 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304662 Consider a different kind of “pain train”—rally your training buddies and pedal to a destination station, then ride the rails back home.

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Riding the same local routes week after week is a guaranteed fast track to boredom and burnout. Consider a different kind of “pain train”—rally your training buddies and pedal to a destination station, then ride the rails back home. You’ll get to explore new roads on the outbound, then sit back and relax (with a cold brew) for the return trip. Be sure to check the train company’s policy on bicycles before you go, as reservations (and a separate fee) for bikes are sometimes required. Use the three trips at right for route inspiration, and get on board for an adventurous training day.

San Diego to Orange County

Just look left for sweeping coastal views from start to finish.

Distance: 82 miles

The route: Starting at downtown San Diego’s Santa Fe Depot, you’ll take Pacific Highway out of town, pass beautiful Mission Bay, and drop down into upscale La Jolla Village. After a fast and fun descent on North Torrey Pines Road, you’ll ride through the coastal towns of Del Mar, Solana Beach and Encinitas. Keep on Highway 101 until Oceanside, where you’ll head into Camp Pendleton (bring your driver’s license to get on base), then pass through San Clemente before turning inland toward San Juan Capistrano and your destination, the Irvine Amtrak station. Hop on the Pacific Surfliner ($24–$36 per ticket, free bike reservation required) for the one-hour, 45-minute ride back.

Good to know: The café car sells snacks, sandwiches, pizza, beer and other beverages.

Difficulty: 7/10 for mileage, not the gently rolling terrain

When to go: Warm SoCal weather makes this a popular route year-round, but the region’s widespread flower blooms make spring particularly pretty.

The Ohio and Erie Canal Towpath Trail

Cruise the historic rail trail, then hitch a ride on the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad. 

Distance: 26.5 miles

The route: In northeastern Ohio, the Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad offers the Bike Aboard! program, which lets people ride their bikes along the former route of the Ohio and Erie Canalway, a national heritage area, then hop on the historic railroad with their bikes for the trip home. Pick up the trail at the Rockside Station, then embark the train at the Akron station after wheeling your way through the beautiful Cuyahoga Valley National Park on a path that ranges from hard-packed dirt/rock to asphalt. Train tickets are only $3.

Good to know: The train can be flagged down at any of the eight stations by waving both arms overhead. Plan to arrive 10 minutes before your scheduled departure.

Difficulty: 2/10

When to go: The Bike Aboard! program opens early April, so plan on a visit between late spring and early fall, when temperatures are warmer.

New York City to New Paltz

Take a cue from pro triathlete sisters Rebeccah and Laurel Wassner and head for the N.Y. hills.

Distance: 25 miles (with a lot of options to add on)

The route: A favorite bike escape for many NYC-based triathletes, including the Wassner twins, involves taking a ferry and train to upstate New York. “You can go from crowded city streets to quiet, rolling country roads in a little over an hour,” says Rebeccah. Hop on the ferry at the World Financial Center Terminal for the 7-minute ($7 with bike) ride across the Hudson River. Wheel your bike across the platform to the Hoboken Train Station (you’ll want to consult the Port Jervis Train schedule ahead of time and leave enough wiggle room) and catch the train to the Campbell Hall station ($13–$17). From there, take Neelytown Road to Beaver Town Road toward Montgomery, then continue north to New Paltz. (Search “Laurel Wassner” on Strava to see the exact route.) “The views are amazing and you’ll get to dip down underneath the Moodna Viaduct [railroad trestle], which is really fun,” adds Rebeccah.

Good to know: The recommended ferry only runs on weekdays, so for weekend travel you’ll need to depart from the 39th Street Ferry Terminal.

Difficulty: 5/10

When to go: Head there late September/early October to view the fall foliage change at its peak.

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Where to Donate Your Old Tri Gear http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/gear-tech/donate-old-tri-gear_304658 Fri, 11 Aug 2017 17:53:48 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304658 Here’s where you can donate your used tri gear to help someone else's multisport dreams come true.

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Just upgraded your bike accessories? Spouse making you trim down your run shoe collection? Here’s where you can donate your used tri gear to help someone else’s multisport dreams come true. 

Local college tri teams

College kids love free stuff! Check Teamusa.org/USA-Triathlon for collegiate club listings and contacts.

Newbies in need

Beginnertriathlete.com has a forum where you can post your old gear, and beginner triathletes can claim it and pay for shipping.

Tri charities for kids

Ask your tri community about local charitites that help get kids into tri. For example, Exceeding Expectations helps inner-city kids from San Bernardino, Calif., move their lives in a positive direction through triathlon, and accepts gear donations. Reach out through their website, Eefoundation.org.

Local tri community

Contact your local club, race directors and tri shops—they’ll be connected in the community and know of people who could use your stuff.

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Quick Set: Rough Water Preparation http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/training/quick-set-rough-water-preparation_304652 Fri, 11 Aug 2017 13:16:37 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304652 This swim workout will help you become a pro at swimming through whatever comes at you come go-time.

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Race day offers no guarantees. Whether it’s mechanical, nutritional or weather-related, you should always prepare for the worst-case scenario. Water conditions at the race are no different. It can be pancake-flat during the course preview, but blustering winds create white caps on race morning. This swim workout, with a little help from training partners, can bring some of that unknown to the pool during practice so you’ll be a pro at swimming through whatever comes at you come go-time.

A:
500 warm-up (no walls—turn at the “T,” no push-off)
10×50 on 1:10 (Tennessee Tumblers*)
500 swim (with 3 people abreast)
10×50 on 1:05 (3 butterfly strokes off every wall)
500 pull (25 FAST, 75 smooth; repeat)
10×50 on 1:00 (start each 50 from a dive)
500 swim (somersault in middle of every lap)
10×50 on :55 (with 3 people abreast)
200 choice cool-down
Total: 4200

B:
400 warm-up (no walls—turn at the “T,” no push-off)
8×50 on 1:30 (Tennessee Tumblers*)
400 swim (with 3 people abreast)
8×50 on 1:20 (2 butterfly strokes off every wall)
400 pull (25 FAST, 75 smooth; repeat)
8×50 on 1:15 (start each 50 from a dive)
400 swim (somersault in middle of every lap)
8×50 on 1:05 (with 3 people abreast)
100 choice cool-down
Total: 3300

C:
200 warm-up (no walls—turn at the “T,” no push-off)
6×50 with 15 sec rest (Tennessee Tumblers*)
3×100 pull with 10 sec rest (descend 1–3)
8×2:00 challenges
100 easy/choice
300 swim (each 50, climb out of the pool, complete 3 push-ups, dive back in)
100 cool-down
Total: 2100

*Kick with body entirely underwater from far flags to the wall, turn underwater, push off and kick underwater back to the flags—no breathing.

RELATED: Open-Water Training in the Pool

More Quick Set workouts

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I’m Racing My First Off-Road Triathlon—How Do I Fuel? http://www.triathlete.com/2017/08/nutrition/im-racing-first-off-road-triathlon-fuel_304642 Thu, 10 Aug 2017 20:38:11 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=304642 If you're ready to trade the pavement for the trails, study up on these three nutritional differences.

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A: Rock hopping, puddle dodging, log jumping, white-knuckle descending—the unpredictability of race day can be intimidating, especially if your skills are still a work in progress. But ask any XTERRA athlete and they’ll tell you that the thrill of off-road racing—and the easygoing atmosphere—will keep you hooked. If you’re ready to trade the pavement for the trails, study up on these three nutritional differences so you don’t face any fueling surprises on race day.

Road triathlon: Fuel/hydrate on a schedule.
Off-road triathlon: Fuel/hydrate when you can.
While your body will perform at its best if you aim to meet your hourly carbohydrate (30–60 grams), electrolyte (400–1000 milligrams) and fluid (20–28 ounces) needs, don’t rely on sticking to a schedule. Off-road bike/run courses are difficult, requiring great skill and focus as you manage the terrain. When you get a chance to fuel or hydrate, take it. Although liquid calories are recommended, as they provide a one-stop shop for meeting energy needs, stuff your pockets with extra gels, chews and bars for those “just in case” scenarios.

Road triathlon: Rely on the aid stations.
Off-road triathlon: Bring your nutrition with you.
Practice fueling/hydrating during training with your preferred sport nutrition products. You need experience drinking (and possibly eating) while dodging rocks and roots. A hydration pack on the bike and hydration belt on the run can make fueling/hydrating less complicated and free you up from relying on aid station support that may not pop up at predicted intervals.

Road triathlon: Push your limits.
Off-road triathlon: Be conservative.
On the trails, your off-road adventure will take significantly longer than the same completed distance on controlled terrain. So your intensity and nutrition will play a big part in your ability to manage the obstacles you overcome on race day. Knowing that no amount of nutrition can help you race like a pro, pacing is critical to your racing success. Because the course dictates your effort and energy expenditure, be sure to preview the course ahead of time. Instead of setting a goal/time pace, focus on small segments of the course that you can execute to the best of your ability.

The technical demands of the trails make it challenging to meet energy needs, but nutrition shouldn’t be an after-thought. Consider off-road racing a constant work in progress. With continued skill and physical development, you’ll become better prepared for the unpredictable, fun moments that come on the trails.

Marni Sumbal, R.D., is a board-certified sports dietitian and the founder of Trimarni Coaching and Nutrition (Trimarni.com).

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