Bethany Mavis – Triathlete.com http://www.triathlete.com The latest triathlon gear, training, nutrition, photos, races, movers, shakers, and more Wed, 18 Jan 2017 20:07:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.5.3 http://www.triathlete.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/apple-touch-icon-180x180-120x120.png Bethany Mavis – Triathlete.com http://www.triathlete.com 32 32 Start Your Job Search at Bikeleague.org http://www.triathlete.com/2017/01/lifestyle/start-job-search-bikeleague-org_297528 Thu, 12 Jan 2017 17:47:11 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=297528 The League of American Bicyclists recently announced the 2016 additions to its list of more than 1,200 bike-friendly businesses.

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The League of American Bicyclists recently announced the 2016 additions to its list of more than 1,200 bike-friendly businesses, now located in 49 states and the District of Columbia. Each business that applied for the designation was evaluated on its initiatives in four areas: encouragement (things like financial incentives for commuting and organized staff rides); engineering (secure and high-quality bike parking, bike repair area); education (provides safety skills information and local bike maps to employees, has information about safety or maintenance classes); and evaluation and planning (has goals to increase ridership or Bike to Work Day participation). Businesses are also recognized in four levels of bike-friendliness ranging from bronze to platinum.

Awardees in 2016 ranged from bike industry companies to food retailers to hospitals. The SRAM office in San Luis Obispo, Calif., for example, made the cut. So did Utah Valley Hospital in Provo, a bronze awardee that provides cash incentives for bike commuters, free bike safety and maintenance clinics, and community support to make improvements for bicycling. Williams-Sonoma headquarters in San Francisco moved up to the silver level for offering bike parking, showers, free annual tune-ups, safety education workshops, and a fleet of bikes for staff to use.

Once they can tout the bike-friendly designation, companies not only become more appealing places to work, but they also receive feedback and support through the program for making their business and community even more welcoming to bicycling. We’d call that a win-win. Learn more at Bikeleague.org.

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Sneak Peek: Triathlete Magazine’s January/February 2017 Issue http://www.triathlete.com/2017/01/photos/sneak-peek-triathlete-magazines-januaryfebruary-2017-issue_297418 Tue, 10 Jan 2017 18:06:36 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=297418 For all you tri tech-obsessed, Triathlete’s January/February 2017 issue brings you everything innovation.

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Pro Prize Money Coming Back To Short-Course Non-Drafting Races http://www.triathlete.com/2017/01/news/pro-prize-money-coming-back-short-course-non-drafting-races_297300 Wed, 04 Jan 2017 20:31:46 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=297300 Pros can compete for their share of $180,000 in professional prize money divided among six races.

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Olympic-distance, non-drafting pros can compete for their share of $180,000 in professional prize money divided among six races.

IMG, the owners of the bucket list-worthy Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon, announced today a qualifying race series for its premier triathlon in 2018. The first five races in the inaugural Escape Series will take place in 2017 at four established races (Nation’s Triathlon in Washington, D.C.; Philadelphia Triathlon; Des Moines Triathlon; and Lake Geneva Triathlon in Wisconsin) and one brand new race—the New Orleans Escape Triathlon.

The announcement is a big deal for the professional triathlon community because it means that, after two full seasons of very little professional prize money for short-course triathlons, Olympic-distance non-drafting specialists could no longer make a career of racing their preferred distance. Pros such as Sarah Haskins, Cameron Dye and Alicia Kaye have been essentially forced to race long (Ironman 70.3 and Ironman races) in order to stay professional triathletes. The 2017 Escape Series and the 2018 Escape from Triathlon will offer a combined professional prize purse of $180,000 ($100,000 for the five-part series, and $80,000 for Alcatraz).

“Our objective is to stage unique, challenging and memorable short-course triathlons,” said IMG’s senior VP James Leitz in a press release. As part of that commitment, IMG says, it will also add races to the Escape Series later this year. The website notes that if any races are added to the calendar for early 2018 (prior to the June date of Alcatraz), that IMG will also add prize money to the total, rather than further splitting up the $100,000.

When short-course non-drafting prize purses were (for the most part) eliminated in 2015, it also raised the question of the value of professional triathletes racing alongside age-group athletes. But Lietz told Triathlete.com that IMG understands the value of pros. “The state of the industry may be moving away from prize purses, but we are changing the state of the industry,” he said. “Part of our strategy involved pros and pros are a big part of the growth of the sport of triathlon. … Pro athletes are critical to our business, pros are the ambassadors for the sport and a key element to creating a world-class event. Pros hold us to the highest of standards and we share a mutual respect—they are the talent, they are aspirational to age groupers and are very important to us. We believe in the power of pro athletes; they are an important part of our strategy as we grow this new Escape Series to further the growth of the triathlon industry.”

The 2018 Alcatraz race will host a total of 24 men and 24 women pros, and 18 of those spots per gender will come from athletes who qualify through the accumulation of points from the five Escape Series races. The remaining six pro spots per gender will be reserved the race organizers as “wild-card” spots, so that they can invite high-profile professionals to compete in the race as well for a share of the $80,000 prize purse.

Age-groupers can also gain automatic entry into the race by finishing as one of the top three finishers per age group at one of the five races. First-place finishers will even win a complimentary race entry (a nice bonus, as Escape from Alcatraz received some backlash in 2015 for raising its entry fee). A total of 108 race entries will be available per qualifying race, while age-group athletes can still gain direct entry to the race via the random annual drawing, which will be more limited than previous years.

IMG also owns, operates and/or licenses the Westchester Triathlon, Karingsund Triathlon and Beijing International Triathlon, which all have been and will continue to be qualifying races for the Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon, separate of the newly formed Escape Series.

2017 Escape Series Races and Dates:

  • Philadelphia Escape Triathlon, June 24–25, 2017
  • Des Moines Escape Triathlon, Sept. 2–3, 2017
  • Nation’s Triathlon, Sept. 10, 2017
  • Lake Geneva Escape Triathlon, Sept. 23, 2017
  • New Orleans Escape Triathlon, Oct. 1, 2017

Find out more at Escapeseriestri.com.

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“Ironman is Like a Potato Chip” and Other Fab Quotes from 101x Ironman Susan Haag http://www.triathlete.com/2016/12/lifestyle/ironman-like-potato-chip-fab-quotes-101x-ironman-susan-haag_296951 Mon, 19 Dec 2016 22:01:58 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296951 The most prolific female iron-distance triathlete, with 101 finishes, pairs her charming personality with her impressive accomplishment.

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The most prolific female Ironman on all things long-distance triathlon.

“My first triathlon was in the summer of 1990. I’m from Louisville, Ky., and I saw a flyer on our gym bulletin board. I don’t even think I knew what it was.”

“I did my first foray—untrained, unexpectedly—at Ironman Brazil back in 2002, when I was changing jobs. I had a couple of friends who said, ‘Hey, we’re racing, you love triathlon—why don’t you come over?’ Ironman wasn’t really on the map. I had done a half, but to be honest with you, we all joke, for the first, I think, 30-plus Ironmans that I did, I would put a McDonald’s hamburger in my special needs bag for the bike, and I would really honestly—I would swear to you—it’s all becoming clear to me now. I think those two guys told me to do that, because I didn’t know any better, and I did. I did learn the first time that I cannot gum and breathe around a burger, so I would have to stop—I would stop and eat my burger with my extra pickles, and then head on. It was something solid. So you can tell I have not qualified for Kona in the appropriate way, but I did have a Legacy spot back in 2012.”

“I didn’t even know I was going to do an Ironman. In fact, if you had said, ‘Was that on your bucket list?’ assuming I had a bucket list, I don’t think it would have been on the bucket list. I don’t even know that I thought Ironman was doable by me. So when I started out and did the first one, Ironman Brazil, I had such a spectacular time, I could not stand it. And the minute I crossed the line, she put the medal on me, she knocked me back across the line it was so heavy. And I’d given it all I had. It took me a couple of days to walk again and to have oozing wounds close. But once I sort of had a handle back on my pain and suffering, I wanted to find the next one.”

“I didn’t really have an end goal or a finishing goal—it just became a lifestyle. And I raced a lot—I would do a 5K one weekend, an Ironman the next, a marathon the next, a half-marathon the next, a half-Ironman the next. I just really liked the events—there was really no planning.

“One year I did an Ironman then a marathon—I think it was Marine Corps—the next weekend I did an Ironman, the next weekend I did the New York City Marathon. And my New York City Marathon is an all-time PR—and it’s not great, but for me it was spectacular, it was a 4:09. So it was almost like my body, once it gets to that level, it’s not spectacularly fast, but it can keep up with what I ask of it. I just recover easily.”

“My mother’s like, ‘So did you get this out of your system?’ And I’m like, ‘Well, it might just be this race.’”

“I might be OCD in a slight way. Just so you know, too—a lot of people train like crazy. Because I race so often, this kind of is my training.

“I’m telling you what—as we sit here right now, I wish Ironman had a frequent flier program, or said, ‘Susan, you’ve spent a billion dollars with us—we want to give back.’ Like I’m Ironman’s charity. I tell ya—it’s one of those things, where it’s like, ‘I’ve got it bad. I’ve got the Ironman Jones bad.’ And it pains me—it pains me—when I’m not in Arizona racing even though I’ve only done that one time.”

“I just love meeting the people, I like the community that we’re in. I like helping. … I like to stand around the back, and I like to find women, especially women who look kind of nervous or something, then I may saddle up beside them and just go, ‘Hey, it’s going to be OK. You don’t have to be the greatest swimmer. If you don’t want to be touched, just stay at the back like I do.’ … You can kind of cheer people on. But that’s the thing I love about Ironman—you literally can experience every single emotion over that 140.6.”

“I was in Tahoe the first year that it happened, when you’re outside, and you’re like, ‘That appears to be snow.’ So I am from Florida and I can no longer tolerate a snowflake—it’s beautiful, but I don’t want it to land on me.”

“The races that I really tend to love are those with a one-loop swim, one loop on the bike and one loop on the run so that I can see as much of the countryside as possible.”

I’m not allowed to say that 200 is out there. Because I appreciate John Wragg [most prolific iron-distance triathlete], but I think he’s something special, and by special, I mean nutty. … I will continue to do them because it wasn’t a goal where you achieve it and move on to something else. I just love the iron distance, Ironman races.”

“I’ve done Ultraman, so that was a three-day event where you sleep in between, and it’s just two sports a day. I definitely enjoy the endurance stuff—the folks that run out in the mountains. A hundred miler? I cannot even fathom. I just can’t even fathom that. Now the Double Anvils—these things where people are doing one thing right after another. The Decaman. I’m more intrigued now than I should be, so that is scary because I’m getting no younger. Tell Sister Madonna [Buder] to look out because I think she does give all women a goal that says, ‘Anything is possible at whatever age.’ It’s more mental than it is physical.”

“The smaller goal I do have is when I stood at Ironman Florida and looked around, 25 percent were women, 75 percent were men—you can tell from green and pink caps. And I know women have families and I know they’ve got a lot of obligations. But I would hope to think it’s not a self-esteem issue or confidence issue. So for me, it matters a lot that all women have an opportunity to tri if they want. … Because I’m pretty sure they’ll like it, and they’ll keep coming back.

“I tell you [Ironman] is like a potato chip. Or a Hershey Kiss. Or like anything you can’t just have one of. There’s some goofy song, that says something like, ‘One is one too many, but one is never enough.’ And I always kind of laugh when I hear that because it’s true. And every time somebody does it, especially when they’re on the course, you hear them go, ‘Oh I’m never going to do this again. It’s so painful. Why’d I sign up? I hate this.’ And I say, ‘Folks. Give it two days.’ Two days, and I think Ironman’s got something they know folks are going to come back. … Because when you cross that line—each finish line is different. Not one of them is the same. And the joy and the empowerment—I just want multiples of, magnifying amounts of.”

Read more about Susan Haag’s story in the January/February 2017 issue of Triathlete magazine.

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Loving Right Now: CLIF’s Nut Butter Filled Energy Bars http://www.triathlete.com/2016/12/nutrition/loving-right-now-clifs-nut-butter-filled-energy-bars_296731 Thu, 08 Dec 2016 21:24:59 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296731 CLIF Bar Nut Butter Filled Energy Bars have creamy centers that add moisture and richness to each bite.

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Nut butter fans, rejoice! Now you can get your fix without lifting a spoon. CLIF Bar Nut Butter Filled Energy Bars have creamy centers that add moisture and richness to each bite. They’re kind of like the lovechild of a classic CLIF bar and a pint of Ben & Jerry’s Peanut Buttah Cookie Core. With 7 grams of protein and 11 grams of fat, the newest CLIF bars will stick around in your digestive system for a while, making them better ride than run fuel. The HR guy who stole half our stash says they’re his new favorite afternoon pick-me-up, while staff taste testers loved them as post-workout treats. We’re all still arguing about which flavor is best. The four choices: peanut butter, chocolate peanut butter, chocolate hazelnut butter and coconut almond butter. $1.79, Clifbar.com 

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How I Fuel: Long-Course Nutrition The Gluten-Free Way http://www.triathlete.com/2016/12/nutrition/fuel-long-course-nutrition-gluten-free-way_296647 Wed, 07 Dec 2016 17:45:13 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296647 Formerly 280 pounds, pro triathlete Tim Nichols shares how he dropped more than 100 pounds and avoids gluten in his long-course fueling.

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Formerly 280 pounds, pro triathlete Tim Nichols shares how he dropped more than 100 pounds and avoids gluten in his long-course fueling.

Location

Wilmington, N.C.

Occupation

Marine industry service and sales; professional triathlete

Course cred

First amateur and 14th overall at 2016 Ironman 70.3 Raleigh (how he earned his pro card); 2015 Beach to Battleship winner; first overall amateur at USAT Duathlon National Championship

Backstory

Nichols ran track at Eastern Michigan University and then Grand Valley State, but he was called into active duty for the U.S. Coast Guard midway through his junior year. He stopped training during his six-year enlistment because he didn’t have time to race. Afterward, he went into business for himself, working in yacht management, deliveries and service and leading a sedentary lifestyle that led to massive weight gain—the 6-foot-3 former track athlete ballooned to 280 pounds by the time he turned 30. Nichols knew he needed to make a change, so he started to run again. But his coach and old college teammate, Tom Clifford, encouraged him to add in swimming and cycling to improve fitness while keeping the stress off his joints. It was a natural transition to start racing triathlons, but something still felt “not right,” he says. He had low energy, felt foggy and was getting rashes—symptoms that led to a celiac disease diagnosis in 2014 that made him completely rethink how he fuels. Now with his pro card in hand, Nichols aims to race pro full-time, qualify for the Ironman 70.3 and Ironman World Championships, and help people young and old, including his three children, live a healthier lifestyle, one step—and bite—at a time.

How he fuels

“Since being gluten-free is a life-long health requirement for me, not a fad, I have to be very careful. Gluten is everywhere. Luckily most of the sports nutrition companies have caught on, and everything else I eat is basically whole foods or made from scratch.”

“My favorite snack when I have a terrible, incurable sugar craving during a monster training period is a gluten-free white chocolate raspberry Quest Bar.”

“My favorite meal post-long Sunday workout is steak and egg whites with spinach, tomatoes and peppers.”

“Pre-race meal includes two cups of coffee and my protein powder pancakes, which can be made with just about any vanilla protein, gluten-free steel-cut oats, egg whites, cinnamon and a dash of baking powder. I add almond butter instead of regular butter in between each piece, topped with raspberries and drizzled with agave.”

“I make sure I add plenty of healthy, natural carbs—gluten-free stone rolled oats, sweet potatoes, tons of berries and lots of veggies—on hard double- and triple-workout days or pre-race, plus two protein shakes for recovery. On recovery or single workout days, I stick to a pretty high protein regimen and incorporate spinach salads with a lean protein like bison or chicken, and berries.”

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PROfile: XTERRA Pro Ben Allen http://www.triathlete.com/2016/12/lifestyle/profile-xterra-pro-ben-allen_296534 Thu, 01 Dec 2016 17:57:37 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296534 Ben Allen, 31, was on his way to a career in surf lifesaving—a popular Australian sport involving several skills from ocean swimming and board paddling […]

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Ben Allen, 31, was on his way to a career in surf lifesaving—a popular Australian sport involving several skills from ocean swimming and board paddling to surf ski racing—when Triathlon Australia targeted him as having the potential to become a world-class triathlete. He accepted the challenge and started racing ITU in 2008, “but I felt a little lost,” he says. That’s when a friend encouraged him to race an XTERRA—an off-road triathlon with mountain biking and trail running. “I fell in love; it captivated my heart and was everything I was searching for and more. I have never looked back since,” he says.

He nabbed podium finishes in his first season, and after six years of racing has more than 20 first-place XTERRA titles to his name. Now he wants top honors at the XTERRA World Championship in Maui, after finishing third in 2013, 2014 and 2016. Something tells us he can do it.

My proudest moment has to be my most painful moment in my career so far. At the 2012 world champs in Maui, I had a great swim, exiting second behind Javier [Gomez, the eventual winner], was feeling great and working hard chasing him down, when at mile 6 on the bike my chain snapped and I was forced to make a decision: either walk back and DNF, or carry my bike for 23 miles into T2, rack my bike and then run 6 miles to finish the race. I chose to finish the race. It wasn’t my day. That’s racing, and I will live to fight another day.

Our life in general is crazy, weird and awkward. XTERRA takes you to places off the beaten track, and some of the places Jacqui [Slack, Allen’s fiancée who’s also a pro XTERRA racer] and I have been to most people haven’t even heard of. Rather than tell you a story, you should come with us to the airport. It’s an experience in itself. I have lost count [of] the amount of times we have had blood, sweat and tears flowing at the airport all over the world. It’s priceless.

It’s funny—I didn’t really know I had so much surf skill and awareness until I made the cross over to triathlon. As a surf athlete you are surrounded with like-minded people just as educated and skillful as you are in the ocean, and making the switch to triathlon has given me huge advantages when negotiating tricky or difficult ocean conditions.

Balance [is key in our relationship]. We both get angry and frustrated when we tip the scale toward focusing on one thing. We basically live and breathe triathlon 24/7, so we try to concentrate on other aspects of our lives to balance us out, and that’s what helps to keep us grounded as people. Having a solid support network is also a huge factor, allowing us to live our life the way we want.

Benny’s faves

Race destination: Philippines

Post-race meal: Burger

Pump-up song: 360’s “Live It Up”

Beverage: Ginger beer

Family tradition: Christmas Slip ‘n’ Slide competition

Trail: Mount Keira ring track trail

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Food Pouches Aren’t Just For Kids Anymore http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/nutrition/food-pouches-arent-just-kids-anymore_296531 Wed, 30 Nov 2016 19:34:37 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296531 The adult version of your kid’s favorite slurp-ready food is catching on, and it’s about darn time.

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Squeezie pack. Pouch nutrition. Whatever you call it, the adult version of your kid’s favorite slurp-ready food is catching on, and it’s about darn time.

For triathletes, the main appeal is portability. You can stash “fresh” food in your jersey pocket, workout bag, or car and forget the days of dealing with mushy, bruised bananas. And most pouches are re-sealable, so you can precisely control your intake.

We say “fresh” food because most pouch makers are right on trend, following the current movement in sports nutrition toward using more natural ingredients instead of processed fuel. Many squeeze packs are a mash of nutrient-rich whole foods, including fruits, veggies, grains and even Greek yogurt. Bonus: Because it takes manufacturers less time to stick food in a pouch than, say, a jar, the ingredients are often fresher than those in anything else you can buy off a shelf.

Triathletes with gastrointestinal issues will want to give these things a try. VP of marketing and innovation for pouch maker Baby Gourmet says ultrarunnners have been swapping out solid food for their products to avoid the nausea that often sets in after constantly fueling for hours.

Clif Bar’s Organic Energy Food pouches for athletes are designed with the same goal of minimizing GI distress while getting calories in. “The size of the pouch allows for greater water content,” says Clif brand manager Dai Deh, “and the higher water content aids in faster absorption.”

Two to Try

Clif Organic Energy Food
The newest flavors in Clif’s Organic Energy Food line, banana maple and apple cinnamon, are both oatmeal-based. Apple cinnamon was our test winner for its apple pie-like spice and pleasant texture. With 23 grams of carbs, 5 grams of fat, 2 grams of fiber, electrolytes, including magnesium, and 140 calories, it makes a good gel substitute on a long ride. $2.99, Clifbar.com

Slammers Protein+
Originally designed for kids, Slammers protein pouches are a smoothie-like snack that tastes best chilled. Made with Greek yogurt and other nutrient-dense ingredients such as sweet potato, acai, beets and bananas, the pouches’ 60 to 110 calories come almost entirely from carbs and protein, making them a great post-workout recovery slurp. Our top flavor pick: creamy banana chocolate. $5.99 for four, Slammerssnacks.com

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2016 Triathlete Gift Guide: The Bookworm http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/2016-gift-guide/2016-triathlete-gift-guide-bookworm_296419 Mon, 28 Nov 2016 22:51:52 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296419 Whether you’re drawn to inspirational reads or informational writing, we’ve found a book for you to curl up with this winter.

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The Bookworm

You are a lover of the written word, and your idea of a perfect afternoon is digging into a good story—preferably with a mug of hot coffee in hand while sitting in front of the fireplace. Whether you’re drawn to inspirational reads or informational writing, we’ve found a book for you to curl up with this winter.

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2016 Triathlete Gift Guide: The Foodie http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/2016-gift-guide/2016-triathlete-gift-guide-foodie_296387 Mon, 28 Nov 2016 20:57:53 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296387 Eating and drinking are more than a necessity to you—they’re a hobby.

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The Foodie

Eating and drinking are more than a necessity to you—they’re a hobby. You’re willing to add 11 miles to your morning commute for a perfectly crafted latte, and you spend your weekends either trying out new restaurants or trying out new recipes (putting to use your new Maldon sea salt collection and Santoku knife, of course). Much like a chef, you care about what goes into your body as well as its presentation. Here are five foodie finds to add to your wish list.

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Sneak Peek: Triathlete Magazine’s December 2016 Issue http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/photos/sneak-peek-triathlete-magazines-december-2016-issue_296188 Tue, 15 Nov 2016 15:57:07 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296188 This issue is packed with our monthly advice on all things training, racing, gear, nutrition and injury prevention (with an extra dose of holiday spirit!).

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The World’s Tiniest Running Coach http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/gear-tech/worlds-tiniest-running-coach_296162 Thu, 10 Nov 2016 21:53:50 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296162 Because it doesn’t use GPS to track your movement, it works everywhere, including indoors.

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The lightweight, quarter-sized MilestonePod measures the basics of distance and pace and a whole lot more using an accelerometer, including your leg swing, foot strike, ground contact and stride length. Because it doesn’t use GPS to track your movement, it works everywhere, including indoors.

You don’t need to carry your phone to record the info, either. Just sync the pod with the Milestone app when you get back to analyze your workout. The app will spit back your numbers and what each of them means. (Milestone says a low leg swing, for instance, can waste energy.) All the metrics are then merged into a single “Runficiency” score out of 100 so you can work on improving your grade.

The third iteration of the pod includes updated waterproofing—it should handle stream crossings just fine—improved accuracy and a longer battery life of 6 to 8 months. Even if you don’t check your Runficiency often, at $25 a pod, it’s worth popping one onto your running shoes for the mileage-tracking “shoe odometer” feature. Never again will you wonder if brick-like legs are coming from training or dead midsoles.
$25, Milestonepod.com

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11 Festive (Guilt-Free!) Treats http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/nutrition/11-festive-guilt-free-treats_296052 Mon, 07 Nov 2016 19:54:04 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=296052 Embrace the holiday season with these 11 holiday-inspired flavors.

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Embrace the holiday season with these 11 holiday-inspired flavors.

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ProFile: American Up-And-Comer Renée Tomlin http://www.triathlete.com/2016/11/lifestyle/profile-american-comer-renee-tomlin_295886 Tue, 01 Nov 2016 19:47:23 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=295886 Hailing from Ocean City, N.J., Renée Tomlin started racing triathlon in 2014 through the USAT Collegiate Recruitment Program.

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Hailing from Ocean City, N.J., Renée Tomlin started racing triathlon in 2014 through the USAT Collegiate Recruitment Program, and recently won her second ITU World Cup title (Hungary). Tomlin grew up a swimmer then switched her focus to running in high school before running collegiately at Georgetown University, where she specialized in middle-distance events. She ran at an elite level after college, even qualifying for the 2012 Olympic Trials in the 1500 meters, but a meeting with Barb Lindquist in 2009 at the NCAA Track & Field Championships had planted the seed of triathlon in her mind. “My gut told me there was incredible potential in this sport,” she says. Currently based at the Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista, Calif., she recently finished on the podium in two World Cups in Asia (Tongyeong and Miyazaki), and is excited to continue seeing where else in the world—and life—the sport takes her.  

My favorite thing about racing triathlon is having the space and opportunity to express competitive edge and athleticism. Yes, you have to be a good swimmer, cyclist and runner. But more so you have to be a tough competitor who is able to deal with infinite unknowns. Take transitions, for example. You cannot “train” to be a professional “transitioner.” You just have to be desperate enough to get to your bike or to get off your bike before anyone else. It’s grit that gets you there, not necessarily skill.

I was in Chengdu, China, last year for a race and desperately needed to do laundry. Being the non-Chinese-speaking, slightly stubborn germaphobe that I am, I just gave the hotel all of my clothes without even trying to understand pricing or service protocol. Once my laundry was returned—all nicely ironed and packaged individually in plastic wrap or hung on individual hangers—I took a look at the bill: $436. I certainly wasn’t laughing at the time, but it did make my roommate Kirsten Kasper chuckle.

The 2015 Continental Cup in Havana, Cuba, was my first race of the 2015 season, coming off of a whirlwind of an introduction to ITU racing in the summer of 2014. I finally had completed the proper base training and was just itching to start putting the pieces together in competition. Likewise, the trip marked one of the first competitions American athletes were able to participate in after President Obama lifted the embargo. Not only was I entering unknown territory as a professional athlete, but also as an American citizen. I felt so fortunate to be able to represent my country in the beginning of new political ties.

Renée’s faves

Training location:
Anywhere Australia, especially Torquay and Geelong

Post-race meal: Burger, beer and mac-and-cheese, if the stomach can handle it!

Non-triathlon sport: Competition-free body surfing

Song on her training playlist: “American Woman” by The Guess Who

Training partner: My mom—she rides her bike while I run, swims in the lane next to me, and always has a snack and positive remark to offer when I come in from a ride. I don’t get to train with her that often, but I sure do soak it up when I’m home.

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3 New Bars We’re Excited About http://www.triathlete.com/2016/10/nutrition/3-new-bars-excited_295180 Tue, 18 Oct 2016 20:04:08 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=295180 We love that nutrition companies are paring down their ingredient lists to only real, recognizable foods.

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We love that nutrition companies are paring down their ingredient lists to only real, recognizable foods. Here are our three new favorite bars.

Go Raw Grow Sprouted Bar

This raw plant protein bar is the first of its kind—it utilizes sprouted watermelon seeds (shelled black ones) as the plant protein source. Each non-GMO, organic bar—available in four flavors—contains 230–240 calories and 12 grams of protein. The bars are also high in (healthy) fats, iron and fiber and contain no more than eight simple ingredients. The smooth, moist texture with just a little bit of crunch was a pleasant surprise, and testers appreciated the lack of protein aftertaste. Taste-test flavor favorites zesty lemon features a citrusy punch, and cinnamon spice tasted very autumn-appropriate. $2.29, Goraw.com

JoJé Bars

Co-founded by pro cyclist (and Triathlete’s own contributor) Jessica Cerra, these gluten-free, non-GMO bars are seriously addicting. Based on the taste alone, it’s hard to believe how healthful the ingredients are—and what great fuel they make for bike workouts. Favorite flavors included the white chocolate coconut blondie (tastes like a decadent cookie), the lemon blueberry quinoa (nothing like a blueberry muffin-esque bar to fuel a morning ride) and pancakes and bacon (inventive and accurate tasting with no actual pork). Each carbohydrate-rich bar contains 260–300 calories and 6–7 grams of protein. $2.75, Jojebar.com

Pressed by KIND

We’re consistently impressed by the bars KIND dreams up, and this line of fruit and veggie (or fruit and chia seeds) bars is no exception. Each vegan bar contains just 3–5 ingredients, which are pretty much the ingredients listed in the flavor name (e.g., mango apple chia). Taste testers loved the taste and texture—basically a thicker yet softer fruit leather—and had a hard time picking a favorite flavor out of the five options (pineapple coconut chia and apricot pear carrot beet were top picks). Each bar has 110–130 calories and is a sweet tooth-satisfying source of carbs and fiber.
$1.79, Kindsnacks.com

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40 Things To Know Before The Ironman World Championship http://www.triathlete.com/2016/10/ironman/40-things-know-ironman-world-championship_294527 Sat, 08 Oct 2016 02:30:45 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=294527 A list of 40 helpful facts to know before watching the 2016 Ironman World Championship on Saturday, Oct. 8.

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A list of 40 helpful facts to know before watching the 2016 Ironman World Championship on Saturday, Oct. 8.

1. In 2014, Mirinda Carfrae set not only the run course record (again) with a time of 2:50:26, besting her 2013 marathon by 12 seconds, but she also overcame an incredible deficit off the bike—more than 14 minutes—to pass Daniela Ryf and defend her Kona crown. In 2015 Carfrae was forced to drop out during the race (after a minor car accident a few days prior) and Ryf earned her first Kona victory, but Carfrae will be back this year in top shape and looking to break her run course record again.

2. The average age of 2016 age-groupers is 43.

3. Disc brakes are a new-to-triathlon technology that’s suddenly making its debut this month on a slew of pro bikes. The technology is replacing rim brakes on aero bikes, as disc brakes are typically safer in both dry and wet conditions. They’ve been on mountain bikes and cyclocross bikes in the past and are on some road bikes, even though they’re not UCI-legal. Brands who have launched disc brake-equipped tri bikes in the last few weeks have been Cervélo, Parlee and Diamondback, and Cannondale’s professional athletes (Andy Potts and Michelle Vesterby) will be riding a bike with disc brakes, though the bike hasn’t been officially announced yet.

4. It will take more than 5,000 volunteers to make Saturday’s race happen.

5. 2012 Ironman world champion Pete Jacobs has had a tough couple of years since earning the world title for the first time. In 2013, he finished as the 32nd male pro, in 2014 he DNF’ed, and last year he withdrew from the race due to an illness affecting his training. He was back on the start list for 2016, but had to pull out at the last minute due to the flu.

6. In 2015, Switzerland’s Daniela Ryf broke a nine-year streak of either an Australian or British woman taking the Kona crown (Aussie Michellie Jones in 2006; Brit Chrissie Wellington in ’07, ’08, ’09, ’11; Aussie Mirinda Carfrae in ’10, ’13, ’14; and Brit Leanda Cave in 2012). Previous to Jones, Ryf’s countrywoman Natascha Badmann was the last non-Brit and non-Aussie to win the women’s crown.

7. Last year, in only his second year of Ironman racing, German Jan Frodeno became the first athlete to win both the Olympic gold medal (in 2008) and the Ironman World Championship title.

8. Great Britain’s Rachel Joyce won’t be on the Kona start line this year, as she took the season off to have her first baby (who was born in early August!). Joyce has been on the Kona podium the last three seasons (two runner-up finishes and one third-place finish), and she has yet to announce when she plans to get back into racing.

9. There are 17 Americans in the professional field, seven men and 10 women.

10. Past performance seems to mean a lot on the Big Island. In 18 of the last 19 years the men’s winner was a top-four finisher the year before. (For example, German Jan Frodeno finished third in 2014 before winning in 2015.) The top four finishers from last year were Frodeno, German Andreas Raelert, Americans Tim O’Donnell and Andy Potts.

11. This will be the largest athlete field ever at the Ironman World Championship with more than 2,300 athletes.

12. A mainstay of Ironman racing is announcer Mike Reilly, who has been declaring “You are an Ironman!” to every finisher of Ironman Hawaii since 1989—starting with Mark Allen the year of the legendary Iron War.

13. We’re still looking for another American who could win Kona (the last
was Tim DeBoom in 2002). It’s finally looking promising, though, as in both 2014 and 2015, there were two American men in the top four—Ben Hoffman was the runner-up in 2013, Tim O’Donnell was third in 2014, and Andy Potts was fourth both years.

14. For the third time, the race will feature separate age-group starts from the Kona pier. Last year the age-groupers were pushed back even farther from the pros and from each other. The male professionals will start at 6:25 a.m., the female pros at 6:30 a.m., then the male age-groupers at 6:55 a.m. and female age-groupers at 7:10 a.m. The change is intended to help have a fair race and prevent drafting on the bike.

15. Reigning Kona champion Daniela Ryf had an impressive 2016 season, the highlight of which was winning the famously fast Challenge Roth in Germany and then winning Ironman Switzerland one week later. However, as the defending two-time 70.3 world champ and a strong cyclist, she was favored to win the Ironman 70.3 World Championship in Australia last month but didn’t break away on the bike—her signature move (she finished in fourth place). Kona fans are eager to see if that was a one-time fluke or a sign of overracing.

16. There will be 64 countries represented on the start line this year—it’s the largest international field in the race’s history.

17. On race day, you can follow the pro race online at Ironman.com with a video stream (with expert commentary) and live blog. (There are other ways to follow the action too.)

18. Internationally, Australia has the most athletes competing with 230, followed by Germany (195), Canada (137), Great Britain (124) and France (119). Athletes will also be coming from countries such as Turkey, Iceland, Slovenia and Denmark.

19. Caroline “Xena” Steffen is one Swiss athlete who, after multiple Kona podium finishes (second place in 2010 and 2012), has failed to earn the top spot. She’s always been considered a contender, but she won’t be racing on the Big Island this weekend—after a rough 2015 season plagued with injuries and illness, she switched from legendary coach Brett Sutton to her new coach Daniel Plews, and spent the 2016 season rebuilding with not so much travel and more 70.3 racing (including a fifth-place finish at 70.3 worlds). She plans to be back in Kona next year.

20. There are seven past Ironman world champions on the pro start list this year. On the men’s side are Frederik Van Lierde (2013), Sebastian Kienle (2014) and Jan Frodeno (2015). On the women’s side are Mirinda Carfrae (2010, 2013, 2014), Leanda Cave (2012), Daniela Ryf (2015) and Natascha Badmann (1998, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005).

21. Male athletes make up 70 percent of participants (1,683 athletes), while 30 percent (718 athletes) are female. That marks the largest female field ever at the Ironman World Championship—topping last year’s total number of women by 2 percentage points.

22. Until the last couple of years, Australia had been dominant in the men’s field, with six consecutive titles captured by Aussies Chris McCormack, Craig Alexander or Pete Jacobs. It now appears that we’re entering an era of European domination, as Frederik Van Lierde from Belgium, Sebastian Kienle from Germany and Jan Frodeno from Germany have won the last three titles.

23. The United States is the most represented country with 804 competitors, accounting for just over 33 percent of registrants this year. Athletes from all 50 U.S. states are represented, with the greatest number coming from California (153), Colorado (51), Hawaii (49), New York (46) and Florida and Texas (45 each).

24. The average high for the month of October is typically around 83 degrees F, with a low around 70 degrees. Weather.com forecasts the temperature to be a few degrees warmer than that for this Saturday, and on top of the black asphalt in the midst of black volcanic rocks, temperatures can exceed 100 degrees, especially in the infamous Energy Lab section of the run course.

25. At 83 years old, Japan’s Hiromu Inada is the oldest athletes in the field, and if he finishes, he could become the oldest competitor to ever cross the Ironman World Championship finish line. Last year, he missed earning a finisher’s medal by just 6 seconds.

26. There has been a huge push from both organized groups and passionate individuals for equality for the professionals on the Ironman World Championship start line. This year 57 pro men and 43 pro women will be racing.

27. Weather will play to the strengths—and expose the weaknesses—of each athlete and can have a big impact on how the race plays out. Varying levels of chop on the swim, potentially heavy tradewinds on the bike and heat and humidity on the run can all make or break race day. Of all of the possible condition variants, the notorious “Mumuku Winds” have the biggest potential to shake up the outcome. Within a matter of seconds, a light breeze on the Queen Ka’ahumanu Highway can shift and create unwieldy headwinds and dangerous crosswinds that have been known to knock athletes off of their bikes. In recent years, race day has yielded relatively mild winds but many pros know what the island is capable of producing. You can bet the strongest cyclists—such as Sebastian Kienle for the men and Daniela Ryf for the women—will be hoping for some tougher conditions to break up the field.

28. There are several Kona rookies on the pro start list this year, but some names that stand out as having the potential to definitely shake up the top 10 (and perhaps even podium!) are American Jesse Thomas and Aussie Mel Hauschildt. Thomas is a six-time Wildflower Long Course champion who, until last season, had been focused on the 70.3 distance. However, he did earn an Ironman win over defending champion Jan Frodeno this summer at Ironman Lanzarote (also a hot, difficult course on a volcanic island). Hauschildt is a former 70.3 world champion who is actually undefeated at in an Ironman—she won the Ironman European Championship this summer, was second at 70.3 worlds and will be eager to race on the Big Island after injuries have kept her away the last few seasons. Also keep an eye on rookie Patrick Lange of Germany, who was the surprise winner of the Ironman North American Championship in his first Ironman race.

29. This was the second year that Ironman offered automatic qualifying opportunities for professionals at the five championship-level races. Athletes who won the Ironman Asia-Pacific Championships in Cairns (Tim Van Berkel and Jodie Swallow), the Ironman African Championships in Port Elizabeth, South Africa (Ben Hoffman and Kaisa Lehtonen), the Ironman North American Championships in Texas (Patrick Lange and Julia Gajer), the Ironman South American Championships in Florianopolis, Brazil (Brent McMahon and Liz Lyles) and the Ironman European Championships in Frankfurt (Sebastian Kienle and Melissa Hauschildt) all earned automatic Kona slots and did not need to worry about their Kona Pro Ranking.

30. Professionals are competing for a total of $650,000 in prize money, with each winner taking home $120,000. The majority of the athletes also likely have lucrative bonuses from sponsors available if they do well.

31. Former XTERRA world champion Olympic mountain biker Michael Weiss of Austria will be racing on the new Diamondback Andean and, as a strong cyclist, will try to break the bike course record with his new ride. Weiss is a somewhat controversial athlete in the triathlon world, as he served a two-year ban (from November 2011 to November 2013) for doping from his time as a mountain biker in 2005 (Weiss still claims innocence).

32. For as sleek-looking and aerodynamic as they are, disc wheels aren’t allowed on the Kona course—crosswinds on the bike course can reach 60 mph on race day.

33. While race day is a thrill to follow, it’s actually the NBC broadcast of the event (which airs a couple months later) that garners the most mainstream attention. It features both the pro races and inspiring age-grouper stories and has won several Emmy awards. This year’s broadcast—celebrating its 25th year—will air Saturday, Dec. 10, at 2:30 p.m. ET.

34. While Mirinda Carfrae has broken the women’s run course record several times (see No. 1), the men have struggled to come close. Despite deeper pro fields and constant advancements in bike and run technology, the men are still chasing after the elusive run record on the Big Island—a record that has stood for 26 years (and counting). Mark Allen’s 2:40:04 marathon from the 1989 “Iron War” race has not been touched.

35. This is the first year that the Ironman World Championship won’t have any participants who entered through the Kona Lottery program—in 2015, the Department of Justice deemed the lottery program as not compliant with lottery and gambling laws. Previously, athletes paid to enter the lottery and then paid the registration fee if they were one of the 100 athletes selected. Ironman discontinued the program and redistributed the entry slots, in addition to paying out $2.7 million to the government.

36. American Linsey Corbin will be returning to race in Kona for the 10th time this year. Due to a 2015 season filled with injury and illness, last year had been the only year the five-time Ironman winner hadn’t raced in the Ironman World Championship since 2005.

37. The youngest athlete in the field will be Japanese athlete Hiraya Shun, who is 19 (athletes must be 18 years old to compete).

38. The sunrise for Saturday will be at 6:16 a.m., less than 10 minutes before the pro men are scheduled to start. The sun will set at 6:05 p.m., and after that, athletes still on the course will be handed glow sticks for safety, and many also wear reflective clothing or tape.

39. The water temperature in Kailua Bay is typically around 79 degrees F, making it too warm for athletes to wear wetsuits—you’ll see most athletes either in just their kits or in swimskins. The water depth ranges from only 20 to 90 feet for the 2.4 miles (and more than half of it is just 20 feet).

40. The final hour at the Ironman World Championship has long been considered one of the most magical parts of the sport of triathlon. Hundreds of spectators and race finishers, as well as local musicians and dancers, gather at the finish line to welcome the race’s final finishers. While it traditionally is a midnight cut-off at an Ironman race, for the third time, male and female age-groupers will have different cut-off times at the finish line because of the change in start times (see No. 14). The men will have a cut-off of 11:45 p.m. and the women will have until 12 a.m. (which also means the athletes have less than 17 hours to finish).

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Kona Trend: Men’s Winner Top Four The Previous Year http://www.triathlete.com/2016/10/race-coverage/kona-trend-mens-winner-top-four-the-previous-year-2_123200 Thu, 06 Oct 2016 12:48:38 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=123200 If history tells us anything, there are four men who have the best odds at taking the 2015 Kona crown.

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If history tells us anything, there are four men who have the best odds at taking the 2016 Kona crown.

The last few years we’ve written about a trend in the professional men’s race at the Ironman World Championship that we noticed, and it continues to hold true each year. In 18 out of the last 19 years, the men’s winner at the Ironman World Championship finished in the top four the previous year. The only exception to that rule was when Germany’s Normann Stadler won in 2006 after a DNF in 2005 (the famous “too much glue” incident), but he had won the race in 2004. Nineteen years ago, in 1996, Belgian Luc Van Lierde came out of nowhere to win the race, setting the course record (which was later broken by Craig Alexander) in his Kona debut.

If history is any indication, the 2016 Ironman Hawaii men’s champion will likely come from the top four men in 2015: winner Jan Frodeno (GER), runner-up Andreas Raelert (GER), third-place finisher Tim O’Donnell (USA) or fourth-place finisher Andy Potts (USA)—meaning the chances are high for an American or German to take the Kona crown.

2015 winner: Jan Frodeno (GER)
→ 2014 result: 3rd

2014 winner: Sebastian Kienle (GER)
→ 2013 result: 3rd

2013 winner: Frederik Van Lierde (BEL)
→ 2012 result: 3rd

2012 winner: Pete Jacobs (AUS)
→ 2011 result: 2nd

2011 winner: Craig Alexander (AUS)
→ 2010 result: 4th

2010 winner: Chris McCormack (AUS)
→ 2009 result: 4th

2009 winner: Craig Alexander (AUS)
→ 2008 result: 1st

2008 winner: Craig Alexander (AUS)
→ 2007 result: 2nd

2007 winner: Chris McCormack (AUS)
→ 2006 result: 2nd

2006 winner: Normann Stadler (GER)
→ 2005 result: DNF (2004 result: 1st)

2005 winner: Faris Al-Sultan (GER)
→ 2004 result: 3rd

2004 winner: Normann Stadler (GER)
→ 2003 result: 4th

2003 winner: Peter Reid (CAN)
→ 2002 result: 2nd

2002 winner: Tim DeBoom (USA)
→ 2001 result: 1st

2001 winner: Tim DeBoom (USA)
→ 2000 result: 2nd

2000 winner: Peter Reid (CAN)
→ 1999 result: 2nd

1999 winner: Luc Van Lierde (BEL)
→ 1998 result: 2nd

1998 winner: Peter Reid (CAN)
→ 1997 result: 4th

1997 winner: Thomas Hellriegel (GER)
→ 1996 result: 2nd

1996 winner: Luc Van Lierde (BEL)
→ 1995 result: Did not race (1996 was his debut in Kona)

More Kona coverage from Triathlete.com.

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How To Watch The Ironman World Championship http://www.triathlete.com/2016/10/news/how-to-watch-the-ironman-world-championship_86294 Mon, 03 Oct 2016 19:00:01 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=86294 Want to follow the Ironman World Championship for the first time on Oct. 8? Here’s what you need to know.

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Want to follow the Ironman World Championship for the first time on Oct. 8? Here’s what you need to know.

The exclusive live coverage will be on Ironman.com, and Ironman tends to gather some top former and current professionals to serve as commentators for the race—last year’s race featured Ironman world champion Greg Welch, and pro triathletes Michael Lovato and Matt Lieto. The live coverage—both a live blog and video stream—will begin on Saturday, Oct. 8 at approximately 6:25 a.m. HST (that’s 9:25 a.m. on the West Coast and 12:25 p.m. on the East Coast). That’s right when the male pros will start, and the female pros will start five minutes later (at 6:30 a.m.). The race will have separate age-group starts, with the men beginning at 6:55 a.m. and the age-group women at 7:10 a.m. The coverage will be mainly following the pro race and will be interspersed with interesting stories of age-group athletes. The video stream will be available to watch on demand following the race at Ironmanlive.com. If you’re following a friend, the enhanced Athlete Tracker tool on Ironman.com now includes multiple time splits for the bike and run, so you can know where exactly on the course he or she is at any time.

Leading up to the race, athletes, media and organizers will be using #IMKona on Twitter and Instagram.

The NBC coverage of the race will air on Saturday, Dec. 10, at 2:30 p.m. ET (check local listings for details). The Ironman World Championship special is generally an accelerated schedule of the eight-hour pro race, and also has an emphasis on inspiring stories of age-groupers.

Check Triathlete.com after the race for video interviews with the top finishers and race analysis of the 2016 Ironman World Championship. Follow all of the race-week action at Triathlete.com/Kona2016.

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Sneak Peek: Triathlete Magazine’s October 2016 Issue http://www.triathlete.com/2016/08/photos/sneak-peek-triathlete-magazines-october-2016-issue_136213 Tue, 30 Aug 2016 18:18:04 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=136213 Our Kona preview issue is on newsstands now!

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Pick up the issue on newsstands today or buy the digital version here

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Taste Test: Is Watermelon The Next Big Thing in Sports Nutrition? http://www.triathlete.com/2016/08/nutrition/taste-test-watermelon-next-big-thing-sports-nutrition_135923 Mon, 22 Aug 2016 18:08:41 +0000 http://www.triathlete.com/?p=135923 Until recently, watermelon wasn’t much of a grab-and-go food, but that’s about to change.

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Nutrition brands are thinking outside the box when it comes to ingredients. We now have pea milk (yes, that’s milk made from peas), maple water, meat bars, and coconut just about everything. And now there’s watermelon. Summer’s favorite fruit is packed with nutrients thought to aid endurance performance, including iron, potassium, and a substance called l-citrulline that may help fight fatigue and that scientists are currently studying for its potential to improve oxygen uptake. Until recently, watermelon wasn’t much of a grab-and-go food, but that’s about to change. Presenting two new ways to get your fix.

DRINKmelon

From the Ironman-athlete creators of DRINKmaple water comes DRINKmelon, an “organic watermelon water” with just one ingredient, sourced straight from melon farms in California, Florida and Vermont. The taste is exactly as you’d expect—sweet, melon-y, clean—and the texture is smooth and pulp-free. The list of nutrients is long: there’s the potassium and citrulline, of course, plus magnesium, lycopene, calcium, iron, and vitamins A and C.. Each 80-calorie bottle contains 20 grams of carbs. DRINKmelon is also affiliated with former pro triathlete Chris Lieto’s organization More Than Sport; for every bottle of DRINKmelon sold, 200 gallons of clean water is supplied to individuals in developing nations.

Buy it: $2.99 for 12-ounce bottle, available at Drink-melon.com the week of Aug. 22

RELATED: What’s On Tap? Six Maple-Flavored Nutrition Picks

Go Raw Grow Sprouted Protein Bar

Go Raw took a different approach to maximizing the power of watermelon, using the fruit’s seeds—sprouted, shelled black ones—as the source of protein in these bars.

Available in four flavors—cinnamon spice (taste test favorite for its autumn-appropriate flavor), zesty lemon, dark chocolate and mint chocolate—each non-GMO, organic bar features a smooth, moist texture with just a little crunch. Each bar contains 230 to 240 calories and 12 grams of protein, plus healthy fats, iron and fiber. We especially appreciated the lack of bitter aftertaste found in many protein bars.

Buy it: $2.29, Goraw.com

RELATED: Multisport Menu

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